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Simulation of prescribed burning strategies in south-west Tasmania, Australia: effects on planned fires, fire regimes, and ecological management values

Citation

King, KJ and Cary, GJ and Bradstock, RA and Chapman, J and Pyrke, A and Marsden-Smedley, JB, Simulation of prescribed burning strategies in south-west Tasmania, Australia: effects on planned fires, fire regimes, and ecological management values, International Journal of Wildland Fire, 15, (4) pp. 527-540. ISSN 1049-8001 (2006) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2006 IAWF

DOI: doi:10.1071/WF05076

Abstract

Computer simulation modelling provides a useful approach for determining the trade-offs between the extent of prescribed burning and the long-term impacts of unplanned fires on management values. In the present study, FIRESCAPE-SWTAS, a process-based fire regime and vegetation dynamics model, was used in the World Heritage Area of south-west Tasmania, Australia, to investigate the implications of different prescribed burning treatments on identified management objectives. Treatments included annual prescribed burning of different proportions of the most flammable vegetation community, buttongrass moorlands. Additionally, a proposed strategic burning treatment for this landscape was simulated for comparison with these treatments. Simulations identified the nature of the relationships between the prescribed burn treatment level and the fire size distributions, the mean incidence, and the mean annual areas burnt by unplanned fires, with all three parameters declining with increases in treatment level. The study also indicated that strategically located treatment units were able to enhance the reduction in the fire risk to vegetation species susceptible to fire (fire-intolerant species). © IAWF 2006.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Environmental Sciences
Research Group:Environmental Science and Management
Research Field:Conservation and Biodiversity
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Land and Water Management
Objective Field:Mountain and High Country Land and Water Management
Author:Marsden-Smedley, JB (Dr Jonathan Marsden-Smedley)
ID Code:50733
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:38
Deposited By:Geography and Environmental Studies
Deposited On:2008-03-07
Last Modified:2014-11-04
Downloads:0

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