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The phenology and impact of the gorse seed weevil, Exapion ulicis, on gorse, Ulex europaeus, in Tasmania

Citation

Davies, JT and Ireson, J and Allen, GR, The phenology and impact of the gorse seed weevil, Exapion ulicis, on gorse, Ulex europaeus, in Tasmania, Biological Control, 45, (1) pp. 85-92. ISSN 1049-9644 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2008.01.009

Abstract

The patterns of gorse pod production, the phenology of Exapion ulicis and its impact on gorse seed production were assessed in a field study conducted at two sites over 20 months in Tasmania, Australia. The production of gorse pods varied considerably between the two sites as did the impact of E. ulicis on mature gorse seed production. At Stonehenge, a site in Tasmania's eastern midlands, green pods were produced in spring and summer and black pods were produced in late spring, summer and early autumn, the timing of which was well synchronised with E. ulicis seed feeding activity. At Lymington, a coastal site in southern Tasmania, both green and black pods were produced almost all year, the timing of which was not well synchronised with E. ulicis seed feeding activity. As a result, the average percentage of mature seeds that were damaged by E. ulicis was 2.7 times higher at Stonehenge (45.5%) than at Lymington (16.7%). These levels of seed destruction were much lower than the levels (i.e. 75-85%) that were considered necessary by previous workers to cause a decline in gorse densities. The results show that additional agents are needed to act in combination with E. ulicis and reduce seed production further if seed feeding biological control agents are to have an impact on plant densities in Tasmanian gorse populations.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Crop and Pasture Production
Research Field:Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species
Objective Field:Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Environments
Author:Davies, JT (Mr Jamie Davies)
Author:Ireson, J (Dr John Ireson)
Author:Allen, GR (Associate Professor Geoff Allen)
ID Code:48800
Year Published:2008
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Agricultural Science
Deposited On:2008-04-09
Last Modified:2014-12-12
Downloads:0

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