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Control of hypertension 5 years after stroke in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS)

Citation

Gall, SL and Thrift, AG, Control of hypertension 5 years after stroke in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS), Hypertension, 48, (2) pp. 260-265. ISSN 0194-911X (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1161/01.HYP.0000230610.81947.04

Abstract

Control of blood pressure after stroke is important for reducing the risk of recurrent stroke. We examined the control of hypertension in a community-based population of 5-year stroke survivors. Cases of first-ever stroke from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study were interviewed at 5 years poststroke. Blood pressure, history of hypertension, and antihypertensive medications were recorded. Individuals were classified as normotensive (blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, no history of hypertension, and no antihypertensive medications), controlled hypertensive (blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, history of hypertension, and/or taking antihypertensive medications), uncontrolled hypertensive (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, history of hypertension, and/or taking antihypertensive medications), or uninformed hypertensive (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, no known history of hypertension, and no antihypertensive medications). At 5 years poststroke, 441 (45%) of 978 first-ever stroke cases were alive. Of these, 305 (69%) had complete data on blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, and history of hypertension. No statistical differences existed between those with or without these data. Eight-two percent were hypertensive; 63% had controlled hypertension, 30% had uncontrolled hypertension, and 7% were unaware that they were hypertensive. Overall, 67% of individuals classified as uncontrolled or uninformed hypertensive subjects were receiving treatment that was insufficient to achieve target blood pressure levels. Uncontrolled hypertensive subjects were more likely to recall receiving advice to manage their hypertension with medication (P<0.02) and diet (P<0.09). Although the majority of hypertensive individuals had controlled hypertension at 5 years poststroke, considerable improvement can be made in the control of hypertension after stroke. © 2006 American Heart Association, Inc.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Epidemiology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Cardiovascular System and Diseases
Author:Gall, SL (Dr Seana Gall)
ID Code:48710
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:29
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2007-10-29
Last Modified:2007-10-29
Downloads:0

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