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Management strategies for short lived species: The case of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery 2. Choosing appropriate management strategies using input controls

Citation

Dichmont, CM and Deng, AR and Punt, AE and Venables, W and Haddon, M, Management strategies for short lived species: The case of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery 2. Choosing appropriate management strategies using input controls, Fisheries Research, 82, (1-3) pp. 221-234. ISSN 0165-7836 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.fishres.2006.06.009

Abstract

A Management Strategy Evaluation framework is used to evaluate management strategies based on input controls for the fishery for two tiger prawn species (Penaeus esculentus and Penaeus semisulcatus) in Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery. Three "assessment procedures" are considered and two forms of decision rule. The performance of the management strategies is evaluated in terms of whether stocks are left at (or above) the spawning stock size at which Maximum Sustainable Yield is achieved (SMSY), the long-term discounted total catch and the extent of inter-annual variation in catches. The focus of the analysis is on management strategies based on the current method of stock assessment because an alternative method of assessment based on a biomass dynamics model is found to be highly variable. None of the management strategies tested is able to leave the spawning stock size of P. esculentus near SMSY if the target effort level used in the management strategy is set to EMSY. Accounting for stock structure through the application of a spatially- (stock-) structured assessment approach fails to resolve this problem. Since the assessment method is generally close to unbiased, the failure to leave the stocks close to SMSY is because the measure of control is total effort and the two species are found (and caught) together. Reducing the target effort level to below EMSY increases the final stock size, but the reduced risk comes at a cost of reduced catches. The best management strategy in terms of leaving both species close to SMSY is found to be one that changes the timing of the fishing season so that effort is shifted from P. esculentus to P. semisulcatus and sets more precautionary effort targets for P. esculentus. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Fisheries Management
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Wild Caught
Objective Field:Fisheries - Wild Caught not elsewhere classified
Author:Haddon, M (Dr Malcolm Haddon)
ID Code:42772
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:25
Deposited By:TAFI - Marine Research Laboratory
Deposited On:2006-08-01
Last Modified:2007-04-13
Downloads:0

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