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A Predictive Model To Describe the Effects of Temperature, Sodium Lactate, and Sodium Diacetate on the Inactivation of a Serotype 4b Strain of Listeria monocytogenes in a Frankfurter Slurry

Citation

Schultze, KK and Linton, RH and Cousin, MA and Luchansky, JB and Tamplin, ML, A Predictive Model To Describe the Effects of Temperature, Sodium Lactate, and Sodium Diacetate on the Inactivation of a Serotype 4b Strain of Listeria monocytogenes in a Frankfurter Slurry, Journal of Food Protection, 69, (7) pp. 1552-1560. ISSN 0362-028X (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.4315/0362-028X-69.7.1552

Abstract

A modified Gompertz equation was used to model the effects of temperature (55, 60, and 65°C), sodium lactate (0, 2.4, and 4.8%), and sodium diacetate (0, 0.125, and 0.25%) on inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes strain MFS 102 (serotype 4b) in frankfurter slurry. The effects of these factors were determined on the shouldering region (parameter A), maximum death rate (parameter B), and tailing region (parameter C) of microbial inactivation curves. Increased temperature or sodium diacetate concentrations increased the death rate, whereas increased sodium lactate concentrations decreased heat resistance. Complex two-way interactive effects were also observed. As both temperature and sodium lactate increased, the death rate decreased; however, as temperature and sodium diacetate increased, the death rate increased. The effect of the interaction between sodium lactate and sodium diacetate on the maximum death rate varied with temperature. Increases in both acidulants at temperatures above 56.7°C decreased the death rate, whereas at temperatures below 56.7°C, increases in both acidulants increased the death rate. To test for significant differences between treatments, D-values were calculated and compared. This comparison revealed that, in general, sodium lactate increased heat resistance and sodium diacetate decreased heat resistance of L. monocytogenes. This information is important for reducing and minimizing contamination during postprocessing thermal treatments. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Microbiology
Research Field:Microbiology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Food Safety
Author:Tamplin, ML (Professor Mark Tamplin)
ID Code:40169
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:16
Deposited By:Agricultural Science
Deposited On:2006-08-01
Last Modified:2009-09-16
Downloads:0

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