eCite Digital Repository

Directional motion contrast sensitivity in developmental dyslexia

Citation

Slaghuis, WL and Ryan, JF, Directional motion contrast sensitivity in developmental dyslexia, Vision Research, 46, (20) pp. 3291-3303. ISSN 0042-6989 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.visres.2006.05.009

Abstract

The present study compared the perception of visual motion in two dyslexia classification schemes; the [Boder, E. (1973). Developmental dyslexia: a diagnostic approach based on three atypical reading-spelling patterns. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 15, 663-687.] dyseidetic, dysphonetic and mixed subgroups and [Williams, M. J., Stuart, G. W., Castles, A., & McAnally, K. I. (2003). Contrast sensitivity in subgroups of developmental dyslexia. Vision Research, 43, 467-477.] surface, phonological and mixed subgroups by measuring the contrast sensitivity for drifting gratings at three spatial frequencies (1.0, 4.0, and 8.0 c/deg) and five drift velocities (0.75, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 18.0 cyc/s) in a sample of 32 children with dyslexia and 32 matched normal readers. The findings show that there were no differences in motion direction perception between normal readers and the group with dyslexia when dyslexia was taken as a homogeneous group. Motion direction perception was found to be intact in the dyseidetic and surface dyslexia subgroups and significantly lowered in both mixed dyslexia subgroups. The one inconsistency in the findings was that motion direction perception was significantly lowered in the [Boder, E. (1973). Developmental dyslexia: a diagnostic approach based on three atypical reading-spelling patterns. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 15, 663-687.] dysphonetic subgroup and intact in the [Williams, M. J., Stuart, G. W., Castles, A., & McAnally, K. I. (2003). Contrast sensitivity in subgroups of developmental dyslexia. Vision Research, 43, 467-477.] phonological subgroup. The findings also provide evidence for the presence of a disorder in sequential and temporal order processing that appears to reflect a difficulty in retaining sequences of non-meaningful auditory and visual stimuli in short-term working memory in children with dyslexia. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
Author:Slaghuis, WL (Dr Walter Slaghuis)
Author:Ryan, JF (Mr John Ryan)
ID Code:40127
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:25
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2006-08-01
Last Modified:2011-11-30
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page