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Assisted passage or passive drift: a comparison of alternative transport mechanisms for non-indigenous coastal species into the Southern Ocean

Citation

Lewis, PN and Riddle, M and Smith, SDA, Assisted passage or passive drift: a comparison of alternative transport mechanisms for non-indigenous coastal species into the Southern Ocean, Antarctic Science, 17, (2) pp. 183-191. ISSN 0954-1020 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1017/S0954102005002580

Abstract

The introduction of invasive species may be the most profound modern threat to biological communities in high-latitude regions. In the Southern Ocean, the natural transport mechanism for shallow-water marine organisms provided by kelp rafts is being increasingly augmented by plastic debris and shipping activity. Plastic debris provide additional opportunities for dispersal of invasive organisms, but dispersal routes are passive, dependent on ocean currents, and already established. In contrast, ships create novel pathways, moving across currents and often visiting many locations over short periods of time. Transportation of hull-fouling communities by vessel traffic thus poses the most likely mechanism by which exotic species may be introduced to the Southern Ocean. © Antarctic Science Ltd.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Evolutionary Biology
Research Field:Biogeography and Phylogeography
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Author:Lewis, PN (Mr Patrick Lewis)
ID Code:38793
Year Published:2005
Web of Science® Times Cited:27
Deposited By:IASOS
Deposited On:2005-08-01
Last Modified:2006-05-09
Downloads:0

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