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Emotional dynamics of soccer fans at winning and losing games

Citation

Kerr, JH and Wilson, GV and Nakamura, I and Sudo, Y, Emotional dynamics of soccer fans at winning and losing games, Personality and Individual Differences, 38, (8) pp. 1855-1866. ISSN 0191-8869 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.paid.2004.10.002

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the emotional reactions of fans of winning and losing teams at two professional soccer games. The participants were 187 male and 146 female Japanese soccer fans who provided biographical information and responded to a slightly modified state version of the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI; Svebak, Ursin, Endresen, Hjelmen, & Apter, 1991) pre-, mid- and post-game. Data from winning and losing fans were analysed using 3 × 2 independent groups ANOVAs for each of the pleasant emotions, unpleasant emotions, and tension stress/effort stress ratings with Bonferroni adjustment to control Type 1 error rates. When winning and losing fans' responses were compared, most differences were found post-game, where losing fans scored significantly higher than winning fans on boredom, anger, sullenness, humiliation and resentment, and lower on relaxation. Also, levels of pleasant and unpleasant emotions changed significantly for losing fans, but (except for boredom) not for winning fans. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Wilson, GV (Dr George Wilson)
ID Code:33229
Year Published:2005
Web of Science® Times Cited:29
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2005-08-01
Last Modified:2011-11-24
Downloads:0

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