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Effect of defoliation interval on water-soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen energy reserves, regrowth of leaves and roots, and tiller number of cocksfoot Dactylis glomerata L.) plants

Citation

Turner, LR and Donaghy, DJ and Lane, PA and Rawnsley, RP, Effect of defoliation interval on water-soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen energy reserves, regrowth of leaves and roots, and tiller number of cocksfoot Dactylis glomerata L.) plants, Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 57, (2) pp. 243-249. ISSN 0004-9409 (2006) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2006 CSIRO

DOI: doi:10.1071/AR05130

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of leaf stage-based defoliation interval on water-soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen energy reserve status, regrowth of leaves and roots, and tiller number of cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L.) cv. Kara plants up to 24 days (3.5-leaf stage) following defoliation. Treatments were based on defoliation intervals of 1-, 2-, and 4-leaf stages of regrowth, with treatments terminated when the 1-leaf defoliation interval had been completed 4 times, the 2-leaf interval 2 times, and the 4-leaf interval once. Selected plants were destructively harvested prior to commencement of treatments (H0), immediately following cessation of treatments (H1), and at 5 days (H2), 10 days (H3), and 24 days (H4) following H1. Leaf, root, and tiller dry matter yield were determined at each harvest event, as well as tiller number/plant. Levels of water-soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen reserves in plant stubble and roots were determined at each destructive harvest. Initiation and death of daughter tillers were monitored from H0 to the completion of the study. More frequent defoliation of cocksfoot plants resulted in reduced water-soluble carbohydrate assimilation and therefore leaf, root, and tiller dry matter accumulation during the subsequent recovery period. Defoliation at the 1-leaf stage severely limited the regrowth potential of cocksfoot plants, whereas defoliation at the 2-leaf stage was adequate for plant recovery, but did not maximise regrowth. The results of this study showed that a defoliation interval based on the 4-leaf stage maximises water-soluble carbohydrate reserves, tillering, and leaf and root dry matter yields. The priority sequence for allocation of water-soluble carbohydrate reserves followed the order of leaf growth, root growth, and tillering during the regrowth period. Nitrogen energy reserves were found to play a minor role in the regrowth of cocksfoot plants following defoliation. © CSIRO 2006.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Crop and Pasture Production
Research Field:Crop and Pasture Production not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Pasture, Browse and Fodder Crops
Objective Field:Sown Pastures (excl. Lucerne)
Author:Turner, LR (Dr Lydia Turner)
Author:Donaghy, DJ (Associate Professor Danny Donaghy)
Author:Lane, PA (Associate Professor Peter Lane)
Author:Rawnsley, RP (Dr Richard Rawnsley)
ID Code:32780
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:20
Deposited By:Agricultural Science
Deposited On:2006-08-01
Last Modified:2014-06-05
Downloads:0

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