eCite Digital Repository

Understanding octopus growth: patterns, variability and physiology

Citation

Semmens, JM and Pecl, GT and Villanueva, R and Jouffre, D and Sobrino, I and Wood, JB and Rigby, PR, Understanding octopus growth: patterns, variability and physiology, Marine and Freshwater Research, 55, (4) pp. 367-377. ISSN 1323-1650 (2004) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1071/MF03155

Abstract

Octopuses are generally characterised by rapid non-asymptotic growth, with high individual variability. However, in situ octopus growth is not well understood. The lack of an ageing method has resulted in the majority of our understanding of octopus growth coming from laboratory studies. Despite not being applicable to cephalopods, Modal Progression Analysis (MPA) of length-frequency data is the most common method for examining in situ octopus growth. Recently, counting growth increments in beaks and vestigial shells, and quantifying lipofuscin in brain tissue, have all shown promise for the ageing octopus. Octopuses generally demonstrate two-phase growth in the laboratory, with physiological changes possibly associated with the switch between an initial rapid exponential phase and a slower power growth phase. Temperature and food ration and quality are key factors influencing the initial growth phase. Temperature, however, does not appear to affect the second phase in any consistent way, perhaps because maturity stage can influence the growth response. There may be basic differences in the mechanisms of octopus muscle growth compared with that of other cephalopods. Furthermore, higher relative maintenance energy expenditure, along with the low energy content of their prey, may account for the relatively slow growth of deep-sea octopuses compared to littoral species.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Wild Caught
Objective Field:Fisheries - Wild Caught not elsewhere classified
Author:Semmens, JM (Associate Professor Jayson Semmens)
Author:Pecl, GT (Professor Gretta Pecl)
ID Code:31535
Year Published:2004
Web of Science® Times Cited:83
Deposited By:TAFI - Marine Research Laboratory
Deposited On:2004-08-01
Last Modified:2005-04-06
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page