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A prospective multicentre study of pharmacist initiated changes to drug therapy and patient management in acute care government funded hospitals

Citation

Dooley, MJ and Allen, KM and Doecke, CJ and Galbraith, KJ and Taylor, GR and Bright, J and Carey, DL, A prospective multicentre study of pharmacist initiated changes to drug therapy and patient management in acute care government funded hospitals, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 57, (4) pp. 513-521. ISSN 0306-5251 (2004) [Refereed Article]


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The definitive published version is available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/

DOI: doi:10.1046/j.1365-2125.2003.02029.x

Abstract

Aims To determine the cost savings of pharmacist initiated changes to hospitalized patients’ drug therapy or management in eight major acute care government funded teaching hospitals in Australia. Methods This was a prospective study performed in eight hospitals examining resource implications of pharmacists’ interventions assessed by an independent clinical panel. Pharmacists providing clinical services to inpatients recorded details of interventions, defined as any action that directly resulted in a change to patient management or therapy. An independent clinical review panel, convened at each participating centre, confirmed or rejected the clinical pharmacist's assessment of the impact on length of stay (LOS), readmission probability, medical procedures and laboratory monitoring and quantified the resultant changes, which were then costed. Results A total of 1399 interventions were documented. Eight hundred and thirty-five interventions impacted on drug costs alone. Five hundred and eleven interventions were evaluated by the independent panels with three quarters of these confirmed as having an impact on one or more of: length of stay, readmission probability, medical procedures or laboratory monitoring. There were 96 interventions deemed by the independent panels to have reduced LOS and 156 reduced the potential for readmission. The calculated savings was $263 221 for the eight hospitals during the period of the study. This included $150 307 for length of stay reduction, $111 848 for readmission reduction. Conclusions The annualized cost savings relating to length of stay, readmission, drugs, medical procedures and laboratory monitoring as a result of clinical pharmacist initiated changes to hospitalized patient management or therapy was $4 444 794 for eight major acute care government funded teaching hospitals in Australia.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pharmacists;adverse events;hospitalisation;readmission;medication
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research Field:Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Other Health
Objective Field:Health not elsewhere classified
Author:Taylor, GR (Mr George Taylor)
ID Code:30006
Year Published:2004
Web of Science® Times Cited:67
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2004-10-06
Last Modified:2011-02-21
Downloads:0

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