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Evaluation of commercial shrimp grow-out pellets as diets for juvenile southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii : influence on growth, survival, colour, and biochemical composition

Citation

Crear, BJ and Hart, PR and Thomas, CW and Barclay, M, Evaluation of commercial shrimp grow-out pellets as diets for juvenile southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii : influence on growth, survival, colour, and biochemical composition, Journal of Applied Aquaculture, 12, (3) pp. 43-57. ISSN 1045-4438 (2002) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1300/J028v12n03_05

Abstract

The growth, survival, and biochemical composition of juvenile southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, were examined in response to a variety of diets, consisting of a natural food organism (blue mussel, Mytilus edulis) and/or commercial shrimp pellets. Blue mussel supported significantly better (a minimum of 25% higher) growth than a range of shrimp diets. Diet intake (0.83-1.26% wet body weight/day) and feed conversion ratio (1.34-2.48) with the formulated diets were generally similar to that with blue mussel (1.03% wet body weight/day; 1.55 feed conversion ratio). Changes in the chemical composition of southern rock lobsters due to treatments were more clearly observed in the digestive gland than in the whole body. Carapace color and tissue carotenoid level varied significantly with carotenoid content of the diets. A caro-tenoid level of 115 mg/kg is required in formulated diets to produce southern rock lobsters of similar color to wild-caught juveniles. In a separate experiment, a blue mussel diet was compared to mixed diets comprised of blue mussel and a shrimp, Penaeus monodon, diet. In the mixed diets, blue mussel was replaced with the formulated diet for either ×days/week or 6 days/week. Growth and survival did not differ significantly among treatments. The use of formulated diets in the culture of southern rock lobster appears feasible but will require increased knowledge of the nutritional requirements. Until specific diets are developed, this study has shown that similar growth can be obtained from a mixed diet, consisting primarily of a cheap formulated diet supplemented with blue mussel once per week. Such a scenario offers real possibilities for significantly reducing the cost of southern rock lobster production. © 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Aquaculture
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Aquaculture
Objective Field:Fisheries - Aquaculture not elsewhere classified
Author:Crear, BJ (Mr Bradley Crear)
Author:Hart, PR (Dr Piers Hart)
Author:Thomas, CW (Mr Craig Thomas)
ID Code:25008
Year Published:2002
Deposited By:TAFI - Marine Research Laboratory
Deposited On:2002-08-01
Last Modified:2011-10-12
Downloads:0

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