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Relationships between protein-nitrogen flux and feeding regime in greenback flounder, Rhombosolea tapirina (Gunther)

Citation

Carter, CG and Bransden, MP, Relationships between protein-nitrogen flux and feeding regime in greenback flounder, Rhombosolea tapirina (Gunther), Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 130, (4) pp. 799-807. ISSN 1095-6433 (2001) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/S1095-6433(01)00409-3

Abstract

This study aimed to measure protein synthesis and growth performance in flatfish, Rhombosolea tapirina, fed on three feeding regimes: 1% body wt. fed in the morning (MM1); 2% body wt. fed in the morning (MM2) and 2% body wt. fed in equal amounts in the morning and in the afternoon (MA2). After 6 weeks there were no significant differences in wet wt., protein growth or efficiency of protein-nitrogen flux. Significantly lower protein consumption on MM1 resulted in significantly lower rates of protein synthesis and degradation compared with MM2 but not MA2. After 18 weeks there were still no significant differences between feeding regimes although trends in growth and efficiency reflected the situation after 6 weeks. Fish were maintained individually, and when analysed on this basis, there were significant relationships between protein consumption and protein synthesis [ks = 0.92, kr + 1.16 (n = 17; r2 = 0.49; P < 0.005)], between protein consumption and protein degradation [kd = 0.82, kr + 1.06 (n = 17; r2 = 0.41; P < 0.005)] and between average daily protein consumption and protein growth [kg = 0.15, krx - 0.15 (n = 17; r2 = 0.75; P < 0.001)]. Thus, increasing protein consumption resulted in increased protein synthesis and growth. However, the combination of high rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation in relation to protein consumption, and resulting high anabolic stimulation and low retention of synthesised protein, contributed to the low growth performance of greenback flounder. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Physiology
Research Field:Comparative Physiology
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Aquaculture
Objective Field:Fisheries - Aquaculture not elsewhere classified
Author:Carter, CG (Professor Chris Carter)
Author:Bransden, MP (Dr Matthew Bransden)
ID Code:21404
Year Published:2001
Web of Science® Times Cited:8
Deposited By:TAFI - Aquaculture
Deposited On:2001-08-01
Last Modified:2011-09-30
Downloads:0

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