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Histological, growth and 7-ethoxyresorufin O -deethylase (EROD) activity responses of greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina to contaminated marine sediment and diet

Citation

Mondon, JA and Duda, S and Nowak, BF, Histological, growth and 7-ethoxyresorufin O -deethylase (EROD) activity responses of greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina to contaminated marine sediment and diet, Aquatic Toxicology, 54, (3-4) pp. 231-247. ISSN 0166-445X (2001) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/S0166-445X(01)00146-1

Abstract

Pathological abnormalities and mixed function oxygenase (MFO) enzyme changes are frequently used as indicators of anthropogenic contaminant exposure and effect. However, there is a paucity of research investigating the effects of contaminated sediment on native Australian benthic teleosts. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment of contaminated marine sediments in northern Tasmania, CYP1A induction, histological and growth response of the greenback flounder, Rhombosolea tapirina, exposed to contaminated marine sediments were examined. Hatchery reared flounder were exposed to reference sediment, contaminated sediment or contaminated sediment and diet for 6 weeks. CYP1A induction, using the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay, and the histological and growth response in the flounder were examined on cessation of the exposure trial. Significant differences were found between treatments in histological, growth and EROD response. Exposure to contaminated sediment and diet elicited a multi-organ histological response: principally partial and total epidermal erosion and multifocal necrosis of the liver. The prevalence of total epidermal erosion was greatest with exposure to disturbed contaminated sediment (66.65 ± 16.65%). The prevalence of multifocal necrosis of the liver was greatest with exposure to contaminanted sediment and diet (66.65 ± 16.65%). Growth reduction, measured as percentage growth inhibition, was evident in flounder exposed to contaminated sediment and diet (18.2 ± 11.99%). Additionally, exposure to contaminated sediment and diet elicited elevated induction of the EROD liver detoxification enzyme (139.65 ± 24.22 pmol/min/mg protein) compared to exposure to contaminated sediment and non-contaminated diet (6.25 ± 0.81 pmol/min/mg) indicating the presence and potential bioavailability of xenobiotics via food. Further, more inhibited growth and histological alteration associated with exposure to contaminated sediment and diet suggest contaminants in Deceitful Cove sediment are cytotoxic. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Fish Pests and Diseases
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Aquaculture
Objective Field:Fisheries - Aquaculture not elsewhere classified
Author:Mondon, JA (Dr Julie Mondon)
Author:Nowak, BF (Professor Barbara Nowak)
ID Code:21283
Year Published:2001
Web of Science® Times Cited:35
Deposited By:TAFI - Aquaculture
Deposited On:2001-08-01
Last Modified:2011-09-21
Downloads:0

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