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Exotic species and estuaries: managing Spartina anglica in Tasmania, Australia

Citation

Kriwoken, LK and Hedge, PT, Exotic species and estuaries: managing Spartina anglica in Tasmania, Australia, Ocean & Coastal Management, 43 pp. 573-584. ISSN 0964-5691 (2000) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/S0964-5691(00)00047-8

Abstract

The spread of exotic Spartina anglica (rice grass) occurs in temperate estuaries of the USA, UK, Netherlands, France, China, New Zealand and Australia. In Australia S. anglica infestations are found in the southern States of Tasmania and Victoria. The ecological, social and economic costs associated with its continued spread in Tasmania have resulted in the development of a management program supporting eradication and control. The paper begins by outlining the suite of problems associated with the management of exotic S. anglica infestations. The legislative framework for S. anglica is then critically evaluated. Recent developments that facilitate integrated coastal zone management are presented and assessed with respect to S. anglica. The paper makes recommendations on resolving legislative and institutional responsibility, promoting sustainable development practices in the coastal zone and raising the profile of environmental and aquatic weeds such as S. anglica. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. | The spread of exotic Spartina anglica (rice grass) occurs in temperate estuaries of the USA, UK, Netherlands, France, China, New Zealand and Australia. In Australia S. anglica infestations are found in the southern States of Tasmania and Victoria. The ecological, social and economic costs associated with its continued spread in Tasmania have resulted in the development of a management program supporting eradication and control. The paper begins by outlining the suite of problems associated with the management of exotic S. anglica infestations. The legislative framework for S. anglica is then critically evaluated. Recent developments that facilitate integrated coastal zone management are presented and assessed with respect to S. anglica. The paper makes recommendations on resolving legislative and institutional responsibility, promoting sustainable development practices in the coastal zone and raising the profile of environmental and aquatic weeds such as S. anglica.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Environmental Sciences
Research Group:Environmental Science and Management
Research Field:Natural Resource Management
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species
Objective Field:Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Coastal and Estuarine Environments
Author:Kriwoken, LK (Dr Lorne Kriwoken)
Author:Hedge, PT (Mr Paul Hedge)
ID Code:18958
Year Published:2000
Web of Science® Times Cited:41
Deposited By:Geography and Environmental Studies
Deposited On:2000-08-01
Last Modified:2017-12-06
Downloads:0

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