eCite Digital Repository

Spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, coherent motion, and visible persistence in developmental dyslexia

Citation

Slaghuis, WL and Ryan, JF, Spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, coherent motion, and visible persistence in developmental dyslexia, Vision Research, 39, (3) pp. 651-668. ISSN 0042-6989 (1999) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/S0042-6989(98)00151-5

Abstract

Three experiments measured spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, coherent motion, and visible persistence in a single group of children with developmental dyslexia and a matched control group. The findings were consistent with a transient channel disorder in the dyslexic group which showed a reduction in contrast sensitivity at low spatial frequencies, a significant reduction in sensitivity for coherent motion, and a significantly longer duration of visible persistence. The results were also examined by classifying the dyslexic group into dyseidetic, dysphonetic, and mixed (dysphoneidetic) subgroups. There were no differences between the control and dyseidetic groups in contrast sensitivity, in coherent motion and in visible persistence. In comparison to the control group, the mixed (dysphoneidetic) dyslexic subgroup was found to have a significant reduction in contrast sensitivity at low spatial frequencies, a significant reduction in sensitivity for coherent motion, and a significantly longer duration of visible persistence. In comparison to the control group, the dysphonetic group only showed a reduction in contrast sensitivity at low spatial frequencies. Comparisons between the dyseidetic, dysphonetic and mixed dyslexic subgroups showed that there were no substantive differences in contrast sensitivity, coherent motion, and visible persistence. The results support the proposal and findings by Borsting et al. (Borsting E, Ridder WH, Dudeck K, Kelley C, Matsui L, Motoyama J. Vis Res 1996;36:1047-1053) that a transient channel disorder may only be present in a dysphoneidetic dyslexic subgroup. Psychometric assessment revealed that all the children with dyslexia appear to have a concurrent disorder in phonological coding, temporal order processing, and short-term memory.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Slaghuis, WL (Dr Walter Slaghuis)
Author:Ryan, JF (Mr John Ryan)
ID Code:17368
Year Published:1999
Web of Science® Times Cited:88
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:1999-08-01
Last Modified:2007-11-08
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page