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Childhood sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses

Citation

Balfour, D and Melton, PE and McVeigh, JE and Huang, R-C and Eastwood, PR and Wanstall, S and Reynolds, AC and Cohen-Woods, S, Childhood sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, Acta Paediatrica ISSN 0803-5253 (2023) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

2023 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI: doi:10.1111/apa.16719

Abstract

Aim: Investigate if childhood measures of sleep health are associated with epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence.

Methods: Parent-reported sleep trajectories from age 5 to 17, self-reported sleep problems at age 17, and six measures of epigenetic age acceleration at age 17 were studied in 1,192 young Australians from the Raine Study Gen2.

Results: There was no evidence for a relationship between the parent-reported sleep trajectories and epigenetic age acceleration (p ≥ .17). There was a positive cross-sectional relationship between self-reported sleep problem score and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration at age 17 (b = 0.14, p = .04), which was attenuated after controlling for depressive symptom score at the same age (b = 0.08, p = .34). Follow-up analyses suggested this finding may represent greater overtiredness and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration in adolescents with higher depressive symptoms.

Conclusion: There was no evidence for a relationship between self- or parent-reported sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence after adjusting for depressive symptoms. Mental health should be considered as a potential confounding variable in future research on sleep and epigenetic age acceleration, particularly if subjective measures of sleep are used.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:biological age, DNA methylation, childhood, methylation age, the Raine Study
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Genetics
Research Field:Epigenetics (incl. genome methylation and epigenomics)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Clinical health not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Melton, PE (Dr Phillip Melton)
ID Code:155526
Year Published:2023
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2023-02-27
Last Modified:2023-03-21
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