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A latent transition analysis of physical activity and screen-based sedentary behavior from adolescence to young adulthood

Citation

Parker, K and Cleland, V and Dollman, J and Della Gatta, J and Hatt, J and Timperio, A, A latent transition analysis of physical activity and screen-based sedentary behavior from adolescence to young adulthood, The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 19, (1) pp. 1-9. ISSN 1479-5868 (2022) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

The Author(s) 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.

DOI: doi:10.1186/s12966-022-01339-4

Abstract

Background: Distinct typologies of physical activity and screen-based sedentary behaviors are common during adolescence, but it is unknown how these change over time. This longitudinal study examined the stability of activity-related behavioral typologies over the transition out of secondary school.

Methods: Year 11 students (penultimate school year) completed a self-report survey (baseline), which was repeated 2 years later (follow-up) (75% female, mean baseline age: 16.9 0.4 years). Latent transition analysis identified typologies of physical activity and screen time behaviors and explored changes in typology membership between baseline and follow-up among those with complete data and who were not attending secondary school at follow-up (n = 803).

Results: Three unique typologies were identified and labelled as: 1) Sedentary gamers (baseline: 17%; follow-up: 15%: high levels of screen behaviors, particularly video gaming); 2) Inactives (baseline: 46%; follow-up: 48%: low physical activities, average levels of screen behaviors); and 3) Actives (baseline: 37%; follow-up: 37%: high physical activities, low screen behaviors). Most participants remained in the same typology (83.2%), 8.5% transitioned to a typology with a more health-enhancing profile and 8.3% transitioned to a typology with a more detrimental behavioral profile.

Conclusions: The high proportion within the 'inactive' typology and the stability of typologies over the transition period suggests that public health interventions are required to improve activity-related behavior typologies before adolescents leave secondary school.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:public health, health promotion, physical activity, sedentary behavior, transition, typologies, pathways, youth
Research Division:Health Sciences
Research Group:Epidemiology
Research Field:Behavioural epidemiology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Public health (excl. specific population health) not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Cleland, V (Associate Professor Verity Cleland)
ID Code:155388
Year Published:2022
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2023-02-17
Last Modified:2023-03-20
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