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A human adenovirus encoding IFN-γ can transduce Tasmanian devil facial tumour cells and upregulate MHC-I

Citation

Kayigwe, AN and Darby, JM and Lyons, AB and Patchett, AL and Lisowski, L and Liu, G-S and Flies, AS, A human adenovirus encoding IFN-γ can transduce Tasmanian devil facial tumour cells and upregulate MHC-I, Journal of General Virology, 103, (11) pp. 1-8. ISSN 0022-1317 (2022) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

© 2022. The Authors. This article was made open-access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding authorís institution. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

DOI: doi:10.1099/jgv.0.001812

Abstract

The devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has led to a massive decline in the wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population. The disease is caused by two independent devil facial tumours (DFT1 and DFT2). These transmissible cancers have a mortality rate of nearly 100 %. An adenoviral vector-based vaccine has been proposed as a conservation strategy for the Tasmanian devil. This study aimed to determine if a human adenovirus serotype 5 could express functional transgenes in devil cells. As DFT1 cells do not constitutively express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), we developed a replication-deficient adenoviral vector that encodes devil interferon gamma (IFN-γ) fused to a fluorescent protein reporter. Our results show that adenoviral-expressed IFN-γ was able to stimulate upregulation of beta-2 microglobulin, a component of MHC-I, on DFT1, DFT2 and devil fibroblast cell lines. This work suggests that human adenoviruses can serve as a vaccine platform for devils and potentially other marsupials.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:adenovirus, viral vector, vaccine, Tasmanian devil, wildlife
Research Division:Agricultural, Veterinary and Food Sciences
Research Group:Veterinary sciences
Research Field:Veterinary immunology
Objective Division:Manufacturing
Objective Group:Veterinary pharmaceutical products
Objective Field:Veterinary biological preventatives
UTAS Author:Kayigwe, AN (Mr Ahab Kayigwe)
UTAS Author:Darby, JM (Ms Jocelyn Darby)
UTAS Author:Lyons, AB (Associate Professor Bruce Lyons)
UTAS Author:Patchett, AL (Dr Amanda Patchett)
UTAS Author:Liu, G-S (Associate Professor Guei-Sheung Liu)
UTAS Author:Flies, AS (Dr Andy Flies)
ID Code:154357
Year Published:2022
Funding Support:Australian Research Council (DE180100484)
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2022-11-25
Last Modified:2022-12-16
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