eCite Digital Repository

Fish feeds supplemented with calcium-based buffering minerals decrease stomach acidity, increase the blood alkaline tide and cost more to digest

Citation

Goodrich, HR and Berry, AA and Montgomery, DW and Davison, WG and Wilson, RW, Fish feeds supplemented with calcium-based buffering minerals decrease stomach acidity, increase the blood alkaline tide and cost more to digest, Scientific Reports, 12 Article 18468. ISSN 2045-2322 (2022) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF (Published version)
2Mb
  

Copyright Statement

© The Authors 2022. This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

DOI: doi:10.1038/s41598-022-22496-3

Abstract

Predatory fish in the wild consume whole prey including hard skeletal parts like shell and bone. Shell and bone are made up of the buffering minerals calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2). These minerals resist changes in pH, meaning they could have physiological consequences for gastric acidity, digestion and metabolism in fish. Using isocaloric diets supplemented with either CaCO3, Ca3(PO4)2 or CaCl2 as non-buffering control, we investigated the impacts of dietary buffering on the energetic cost of digestion (i.e. specific dynamic action or SDA), gastric pH, the postprandial blood alkalosis (the "alkaline tide") and growth in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Increases in dietary buffering were significantly associated with increased stomach chyme pH, postprandial blood HCO3, net base excretion, the total SDA and peak SDA but did not influence growth efficiency in a 21 day trial. This result shows that aspects of a meal that have no nutritional value can influence the physiological and energetic costs associated with digestion in fish, but that a reduction in the SDA will not always lead to improvements in growth efficiency. We discuss the broader implications of these findings for the gastrointestinal physiology of fishes, trade-offs in prey choice in the wild, anthropogenic warming and feed formulation in aquaculture.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:acid base regulation, feeding, digestion, metabolism, prey choice
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Ecological physiology
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - aquaculture
Objective Field:Aquaculture fin fish (excl. tuna)
UTAS Author:Goodrich, HR (Dr Harriet Goodrich)
ID Code:154154
Year Published:2022
Deposited By:Fisheries and Aquaculture
Deposited On:2022-11-03
Last Modified:2022-12-02
Downloads:4 View Download Statistics

Repository Staff Only: item control page