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The challenges and suffering of caring for people with primary malignant glioma: qualitative perspectives on improving current supportive and palliative care practices

Citation

Collins, A and Lethborg, C and Brand, C and Gold, M and Moore, G and Sundararajan, V and Murphy, M and Philip, J, The challenges and suffering of caring for people with primary malignant glioma: qualitative perspectives on improving current supportive and palliative care practices, BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, 4, (1) pp. 68-76. ISSN 2045-435X (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright (2014) BMJ Publishing Group. Published source must be acknowledged with citation and must link to publisher version.

DOI: doi:10.1136/bmjspcare-2012-000419

Abstract

Objectives: Carers of patients with high-grade primary malignant glioma (PMG) are known to face extraordinary challenges, as they care for patients with multiple profound and often devastating physical, cognitive and behavioural changes. This study aimed to understand the supportive and palliative care needs in this setting, with a particular focus upon care at the end-of-life, which has hitherto been neglected.

Methods: This prospective qualitative study undertook in-depth interviews with 23 current and bereaved carers of adults with PMG. Carers were recruited from outpatient and inpatient services of two Australian metropolitan hospitals, including neurosurgery, oncology and palliative care. Thematic analysis was conducted by three independent researchers, using methods informed by grounded theory.

Results: Carers described significant needs in relation to three distinct domains: the challenge of caring; the lack of support available to carers and the suffering of caring. The need for care coordination was highlighted as it may enable a series of recommendations for improved care, including: navigation between health providers, individualised, staged information; routine, proactive telephone needs-assessment and emotional support; and early routine integration of palliative care services.

Conclusions: The results of this study shed new light on providing timely information and palliative care to support carers. We call for health services to reconsider the current medical model for this patient group, where patients are the centre of care, information and support, towards a more collaborative model which places carers and patients into a partnership.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:suffering, carers, cancer, palliative Care
Research Division:Health Sciences
Research Group:Health services and systems
Research Field:Family care
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Provision of health and support services
Objective Field:Palliative care
UTAS Author:Lethborg, C (Dr Carolyn Lethborg)
ID Code:153780
Year Published:2014
Deposited By:UTAS Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2022-10-06
Last Modified:2022-11-03
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