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Prevalence and associations of general practice registrars' management of atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional analysis from the registrar clinical encounters in training study

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Willems, A and Tapley, A and Fielding, A and Tng, ETV and Holliday, EG and Van Driel, ML and Ball, JI and Davey, AR and Patsan, I and FitzGerald, K and Spike, NA and Magin, PJ, Prevalence and associations of general practice registrars' management of atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional analysis from the registrar clinical encounters in training study, Dermatology Practical and Conceptual, 11, (4) Article e2021128. ISSN 2160-9381 (2021) [Refereed Article]


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2021 Willems et al. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). This license allows re-users to distribute, remix, adapt, and build upon the material in any medium or format, so long as attribution is given to the creator. The license allows for commercial use.

DOI: doi:10.5826/dpc.1104a128

Abstract

Introduction: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory condition which imposes substantial burden upon patients and their families. As a frequent primary care presentation, general practice (GP) trainees must develop adequate skills in AD diagnosis and management. Objectives: We aimed to explore the prevalence and associations of GP registrars' management of patients with AD. Methods: This study used data from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project, an ongoing cohort study of the clinical and educational experience of Australian GP registrars. Registrar, patient, and consultation factors were independent variables in multivariable logistic regression with outcome factor 'diagnosis/problem being AD'. Results: From 2010-2019, 2,783 registrars (96% response rate) provided data from 381,180 consultations. AD was encountered in 0.6% of consults. AD was more likely to be seen in patients aged 0-1 years and patients from a non-English speaking background. AD was less likely to be seen in Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander patients. Learning goals were more likely to be generated for AD and these consultations were associated with registrars seeking information or assistance. AD was strongly associated with a medication being prescribed, of which the most prescribed medications were mild or moderate potency topical corticosteroids. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that, similar to other dermatological presentations, registrars find AD challenging to manage. There may be some gaps in AD management knowledge and application.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Atopic dermatitis, eczema, general practice, dermatologists, family practice
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Clinical sciences
Research Field:Dermatology
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding knowledge in the biomedical and clinical sciences
UTAS Author:FitzGerald, K (Dr Kristen FitzGerald)
ID Code:152844
Year Published:2021
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Mathematics
Deposited On:2022-08-25
Last Modified:2022-11-18
Downloads:2 View Download Statistics

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