eCite Digital Repository

Correlated resting-state functional MRI activity of frontostriatal, thalamic, temporal, and cerebellar brain regions differentiates stroke survivors with high compared to low depressive symptom scores

Citation

Goodin, P and Lamp, G and Vidyasagar, R and Connelly, A and Rose, S and Campbell, BCV and Tse, T and Ma, H and Howells, DW and Hankey, GJ and Davis, S and Donnan, G and Carey, LM, Correlated resting-state functional MRI activity of frontostriatal, thalamic, temporal, and cerebellar brain regions differentiates stroke survivors with high compared to low depressive symptom scores, Neural Plasticity, 2019 pp. 1-12. ISSN 2090-5904 (2019) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF
Not available
7Mb
  

DOI: doi:10.1155/2019/2357107

Abstract

Background: One in three survivors of stroke experience poststroke depression (PSD). PSD has been linked with poorer recovery of function and cognition, yet our understanding of potential mechanisms is currently limited. Alterations in resting-state functional MRI have been investigated to a limited extent. Fluctuations in low frequency signal are reported, but it is unknown if interactions are present between the level of depressive symptom score and intrinsic brain activity in varying brain regions.

Objective: To investigate potential interaction effects between whole-brain resting-state activity and depressive symptoms in stroke survivors with low and high levels of depressive symptoms.

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 63 stroke survivors who were assessed at 3 months poststroke for depression, using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-SIGMA), and for brain activity using fMRI. A MADRS-SIGMA score of >8 was classified as high depressive symptoms. Fractional amplitude of frequency fluctuations (fALFF) data across three frequency bands (broadband, i.e., ~0.01-0.08; subbands, i.e., slow-5: ~0.01-0.027 Hz, slow-4: 0.027-0.07) was examined.

Results: Of the 63 stroke survivors, 38 were classified as "low-depressive symptoms" and 25 as "high depressive symptoms." Six had a past history of depression. We found interaction effects across frequency bands in several brain regions that differentiated the two groups. The broadband analysis revealed interaction effects in the left insula and the left superior temporal lobe. The subband analysis showed contrasting fALFF response between the two groups in the left thalamus, right caudate, and left cerebellum. Across the three frequency bands, we found contrasting fALFF response in areas within the fronto-limbic-thalamic network and cerebellum.

Conclusions: We provide evidence that fALFF is sensitive to changes in poststroke depressive symptom severity and implicates frontostriatal and cerebellar regions, consistent with previous studies. The use of multiband analysis could be an effective method to examine neural correlates of depression after stroke.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Neurology and neuromuscular diseases
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Treatment of human diseases and conditions
UTAS Author:Howells, DW (Professor David Howells)
ID Code:152453
Year Published:2019
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:UTAS Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2022-08-19
Last Modified:2022-09-15
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page