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Investigating differences between drugs used in the Australian night-time economy: Demographics, substance use, and harm

Citation

Pennay, A and Jenkinson, R and Quinn, B and Droste, NT and Peacock, A and Lubman, DI and Miller, PG, Investigating differences between drugs used in the Australian night-time economy: Demographics, substance use, and harm, Substance Use and Misuse, 52, (1) pp. 71-81. ISSN 1082-6084 (2017) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

DOI: doi:10.1080/10826084.2016.1214153

Abstract

Background: Understanding the characteristics of drug users in the night-time economy (NTE), and whether particular drugs are associated with risky practices and experience of harm, is necessary to inform targeted policy responses in this context.

Objectives: To investigate the correlates of drugs used in the Australian NTE relating to demographics, alcohol use, and experience of harm.

Methods: Patrons were interviewed in the NTE of five Australian cities in 2012-2013 (n = 7,028; 61.9% male, median age 22 years). A custom designed survey gathered demographic data, alcohol, and substance use on the current night, and experience of harm in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the correlates of drug use.

Results: Ecstasy was most commonly reported (4.0%), followed by cannabis (2.9%), methamphetamine (2.6%), and cocaine (1.6%). Ecstasy users were more likely to be younger and report energy drink consumption. Cannabis users were more likely to be male, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries and sexual aggression in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Methamphetamine users were more likely to have been interviewed later, and to have engaged in pre-drinking. Cocaine users were more likely to be male, aged 21 years or more, have a blood alcohol concentration of greater than 0.10%, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries in the past three months. Conclusions/Importance: We identified significant differences between types of drug users and the harms they experience, underscoring the need to develop innovative harm reduction policies in the NTE rather than blanket population-based approaches.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Australia, cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamine, night-time economy
Research Division:Psychology
Research Group:Social and personality psychology
Research Field:Social psychology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Substance abuse
UTAS Author:Peacock, A (Miss Amy Peacock)
ID Code:152272
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2022-08-16
Last Modified:2022-09-07
Downloads:0

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