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Associations of dietary pattern and sleep duration with cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults: A seven-year follow-up cohort study

Citation

Shang, X and Hodge, AM and Hill, E and Zhu, Z and He, M, Associations of dietary pattern and sleep duration with cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults: A seven-year follow-up cohort study, Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 82, (4) pp. 1559-1571. ISSN 1387-2877 (2021) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.3233/JAD-201329

Abstract

Background: A few studies have linked dietary patterns and sleep to cognitive decline.

Objective: To examine the independent and joint associations of dietary patterns and sleep with cognitive decline.

Methods: Our analysis included 2,307 participants aged 55- 89 years at baseline from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Dietary intake was assessed using weighing methods in combination with 24 h dietary recalls for three consecutive days. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to identify major dietary factors. Cognition was assessed in 1997, 2000, 2004, 2006, and 2015.

Results: Five dietary patterns were identified: dairy-fruits-fast foods, grains-vegetables-pork, plant-based food, beans-mushroom, and beverages-nuts patterns. Beans-mushroom pattern and sleep duration of 8 h/day were defined as healthy habits. There was a positive association between the beans-mushroom pattern and change in the global cognitive Z-score over seven years (β (95% CI) for quintile 5 versus quintile 1:0.17 (0.05, 0.30)). Compared to individuals with sleep duration of 8 h/day, those with sleep duration of≤5 h/day (β (95% CI): - 0.23 (- 0.45, - 0.00)) or > 10 h/day (- 0.52 (- 0.73, - 0.32)) had a greater decrease in global cognitive Z-score. Compared to individuals with no healthy patterns, those with a healthy dietary pattern only (β (95% CI): 0.18 (0.08, 0.28)), healthy sleep pattern only (0.13 (0.04, 0.23), and both healthy dietary and sleep patterns (0.19 (0.08, 0.31)) had a relative increase in global cognitive Z-score.

Conclusion: Our findings highlight the importance of involving both diet and sleep as intervention priorities for the potential prevention of cognitive decline.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:cognitive decline, dietary pattern, sleep duration
Research Division:Health Sciences
Research Group:Health services and systems
Research Field:Aged health care
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Prevention of human diseases and conditions
UTAS Author:Hill, E (Dr Eddy Roccati)
ID Code:152251
Year Published:2021
Deposited By:Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre
Deposited On:2022-08-16
Last Modified:2022-08-23
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