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Non-fatal opioid overdose, naloxone access, and naloxone training among people who recently used opioids or received opioid agonist treatment in Australia: The ETHOS Engage study

Citation

Conway, A and Valerio, H and Peacock, A and Degenhardt, L and Hayllar, J and Harrod, ME and Henderson, C and Read, P and Gilliver, R and Christmass, M and Dunlop, A and Montebello, M and Whitton, G and Reid, D and Lam, T and Alavi, M and Silk, D and Marshall, AD and Treloar, C and Dore, GJ and Grebely, J, ETHOS Engage Study Group, Non-fatal opioid overdose, naloxone access, and naloxone training among people who recently used opioids or received opioid agonist treatment in Australia: The ETHOS Engage study, International Journal of Drug Policy, 96 pp. 1-9. ISSN 0955-3959 (2021) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2021.103421

Abstract

Background: Overdose is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among people who use opioids. Naloxone can reverse opioid overdoses and can be distributed and administered with minimal training. People with experience of overdose are a key population to target for overdose prevention strategies. This study aims to understand if factors associated with recent non-fatal opioid overdose are the same as factors associated with naloxone access and naloxone training in people who recently used opioids or received opioid agonist treatment (OAT). Methods: ETHOS Engage is an observational study of people who inject drugs in Australia. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios for non-fatal opioid overdose, naloxone access and naloxone training. Results: Between May 2018-September 2019, 1280 participants who recently used opioids or received OAT were enrolled (62% aged >40 years; 35% female, 80% receiving OAT, 62% injected drugs in the preceding month). Recent opioid overdose (preceding 12 months) was reported by 7% of participants, lifetime naloxone access by 17%, and lifetime naloxone training by 14%. Compared to people receiving OAT with no additional opioid use, recent opioid, benzodiazepine (preceding six months), and hazardous alcohol use was associated with recent opioid overdose (aOR 3.91; 95%CI: 1.68-9.10) and lifetime naloxone access (aOR 2.12; 95%CI 1.29-3.48). Among 91 people who reported recent overdose, 65% had never received take-home naloxone or naloxone training. Conclusions: Among people recently using opioids or receiving OAT, benzodiazepine and hazardous alcohol use is associated with non-fatal opioid overdose. Not all factors associated with non-fatal overdose correspond to factors associated with naloxone access. Naloxone access and training is low across all groups. Additional interventions are needed to scale up naloxone provision.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Australia, naloxone, opioids, overdose
Research Division:Psychology
Research Group:Biological psychology
Research Field:Behavioural neuroscience
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Substance abuse
UTAS Author:Peacock, A (Miss Amy Peacock)
ID Code:151840
Year Published:2021
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2022-08-05
Last Modified:2022-09-08
Downloads:0

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