eCite Digital Repository

Protein metabolism in the liver and white muscle is associated with feed efficiency in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in seawater: evidence from proteomic analysis

Citation

Esmaeili, M and Carter, CG and Wilson, R and Walker, SP and Miller, MR and Bridle, AR and Symonds, JE, Protein metabolism in the liver and white muscle is associated with feed efficiency in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in seawater: evidence from proteomic analysis, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D, 42 Article 100994. ISSN 1744-117X (2022) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF
Pending copyright assessment - Request a copy
2Mb
  

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.cbd.2022.100994

Abstract

Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie differences in feed efficiency (FE) is an important step toward optimising growth and achieving sustainable salmonid aquaculture. In this study, the liver and white muscle proteomes of feed efficient (EFF) and inefficient (INEFF) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in seawater were investigated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 2746 liver and 702 white muscle proteins were quantified and compared between 21 EFF and 22 INEFF fish. GSEA showed that gene sets related to protein synthesis were enriched in the liver and white muscle of the EFF group, while conversely, pathways related to protein degradation (amino acid catabolism and proteolysis, respectively) were the most affected processes in the liver and white muscle of INEFF fish. Estimates of individual daily feed intake and share of the meal within tank were significantly higher in the INEFF than the EFF fish showing INEFF fish were likely more dominant during feeding and overfed. Overeating by the INEFF fish was associated with an increase in protein catabolism. This study found that fish with different FE values had expression differences in the gene sets related to protein turnover, and this result supports the hypothesis that protein metabolism plays a role in FE.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:efficient fish, growth performance, overfeeding, protein metabolism, proteomics
Research Division:Agricultural, Veterinary and Food Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries sciences
Research Field:Aquaculture
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - aquaculture
Objective Field:Aquaculture fin fish (excl. tuna)
UTAS Author:Esmaeili, M (Mr Moha Esmaeili)
UTAS Author:Carter, CG (Professor Chris Carter)
UTAS Author:Wilson, R (Dr Richard Wilson)
UTAS Author:Miller, MR (Dr Matthew Miller)
UTAS Author:Bridle, AR (Associate Professor Andrew Bridle)
UTAS Author:Symonds, JE (Dr Jane Symonds)
ID Code:150284
Year Published:2022
Deposited By:Fisheries and Aquaculture
Deposited On:2022-06-06
Last Modified:2022-06-08
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page