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Defining Post-Pandemic Work and Organizations: The Need for Team Belongingness and Trust

Citation

Crawford, J, Defining Post-Pandemic Work and Organizations: The Need for Team Belongingness and Trust, Leadership - New Insights, IntechOpen, M Franco (ed), pp. 1-14. (2022) [Research Book Chapter]

Copyright Statement

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Official URL: https://www.intechopen.com/online-first/79940

DOI: doi:10.5772/intechopen.102055

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought forth substantial unrest in the ways in which people work and organize. This had led to disconnection, rapid adaptation, work from home, emergence of a new digital industry, and an opportunity to create anew. This chapter provides a position for the future state of work and organizing, drawing on the belongingness hypothesis, to characterize a revised method of human connection that acknowledges unique differences in online connections. It also explores the role that flexibility and working from home have on organizational outcomes, through changing presenteeism, changes in how people develop trust, and how social resources are deployed. Advancing an understanding of this position creates a possible post-pandemic model of work that acknowledges the current climate and the learnings from before that pandemic. Through genuine acknowledgment of the current and past ways of working, it is possible to build a pathway to heighten employee’s sense of belonging and trust. This will support the return to, and evolution of, a form of normality post-pandemic.

Item Details

Item Type:Research Book Chapter
Keywords:COVID-19, working from home, sense of belonging, flourishing, belongingness, connectivity
Research Division:Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
Research Group:Strategy, management and organisational behaviour
Research Field:Leadership
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding knowledge in commerce, management, tourism and services
UTAS Author:Crawford, J (Dr Joseph Crawford)
ID Code:148872
Year Published:2022
Deposited By:Office Academic Executive Director
Deposited On:2022-02-17
Last Modified:2022-06-15
Downloads:0

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