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Dietary pattern trajectories across adolescence and early adulthood and their associations with childhood and parental factors

Citation

Appannah, G and Murray, K and Trapp, G and Dymock, M and Oddy, WH and Ambrosini, GL, Dietary pattern trajectories across adolescence and early adulthood and their associations with childhood and parental factors, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 113, (1) pp. 36-46. ISSN 0002-9165 (2021) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Nutrition. All rights reserved

DOI: doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqaa281

Abstract

Background: Although adolescent dietary patterns tend to be of poor quality, it is unclear whether dietary patterns established in adolescence persist into adulthood.

Objectives: We examined trajectories across adolescence and early adulthood for 2 major dietary patterns and their associations with childhood and parental factors.

Methods: Using data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine Study), intakes of 38 food groups were estimated at ages 14, 17, 20 and 22 y in 1414 participants using evaluated FFQs. Using factor analysis, 2 major dietary patterns (healthy and Western) were consistently identified across follow-ups. Sex-specific group-based modeling assessed the variation in individual dietary pattern ȥ scores to identify group trajectories for each pattern between ages 14 and 22 y and to assess their associations with childhood and parental factors.

Results: Two major trajectory groups were identified for each pattern. Between ages 14 and 22 y, a majority of the cohort (70% males, 73% females) formed a trajectory group with consistently low ȥ scores for the healthy dietary pattern. The remainder had trajectories showing either declining (27% females) or reasonably consistent healthy dietary pattern ȥ scores (30% males). For the Western dietary pattern, the majority formed trajectories with reasonably consistent average scores (79% males, 81% females) or low scores that declined over time. However, 21% of males had a trajectory of steady, marked increases in Western dietary pattern scores over time. A lower maternal education and higher BMI (in kg/m2) were positively associated with consistently lower scores of the healthy dietary pattern. Lower family income, family functioning score, maternal age, and being in a single-parent family were positively related to higher scores of the Western dietary pattern.

Conclusions: Poor dietary patterns established in adolescence are likely to track into early adulthood, particularly in males. This study highlights the transition between adolescence and early adulthood as a critical period and the populations that could benefit from dietary interventions.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:dietary patterns, tracking, trajectories, Raine Study, adolescence, early adulthood
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and dietetics
Research Field:Public health nutrition
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
UTAS Author:Oddy, WH (Professor Wendy Oddy)
ID Code:146150
Year Published:2021
Web of Science® Times Cited:4
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2021-08-23
Last Modified:2021-09-27
Downloads:0

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