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Does isoniazid preventive therapy provide better treatment outcomes in HIV-infected individuals in Northern Ethiopia? A retrospective cohort study

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Atey, TM and Bitew, H and Asgedom, SW and Endrias, A and Berhe, DF, Does isoniazid preventive therapy provide better treatment outcomes in HIV-infected individuals in Northern Ethiopia? A retrospective cohort study, AIDS Research and Treatment pp. 1-11. ISSN 2090-1240 (2020) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright © 2020 Tesfay Mehari Atey et al. ,is is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License, (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI: doi:10.1155/2020/7025738

Abstract

Objectives: Early antiretroviral therapy (ART), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), and isoniazid-rifapentine (3HP) are effective strategies for preventing tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV (PLHIV). The study aimed to determine the effect of IPT on the TB incidence, follow-up CD4+ T cells, and all-cause mortality rate.

Participants: Eligible patients on ART (n = 1, 863) were categorized into one-to-two ratios of exposed groups to IPT (n = 621) and nonexposed groups to IPT (n = 1, 242). Exposed groups entered the cohort at their first prescription of IPT, and unexposed groups entered into the study at the first prescription of ART and then followed until the occurrence of the outcome or date of administrative censoring (June 30, 2017). The outcome endpoints were TB incidence, follow-up CD4+ T cells, and all-cause mortality rate.

Results: The follow-up CD4+ T cells for the exposed and nonexposed groups were 405.74 and 366.95 cells/mm (World Health Organization (WHO), 2017), respectively, a statistically significant finding (t1861 = −3.770, , p < 0.0001 ; Cohen’s d = 0.186). Nine percent of the exposed patients (620 incidence of TB per 100,000 person-years (PYs)) and 21.9% of the nonexposed patients (3160 incidence of TB per 100,000 PYs) developed TB. Mortality rate (per 100,000 PYs) was 440 for the exposed and 1490 for the unexposed patients. Statistically significant determinants of the all-cause mortality were unscheduled follow-up (AHR = 1.601; 95% CI: 1.154–2.222) and unable to work properly (AHR = 2.324; 95% CI: 1.643–3.288).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates the effect of IPT in reducing incidence of TB and all-cause mortality rate and improving follow-up CD4+ T cells. Promoting IPT use can help to achieve the TB eradicating national agenda in Ethiopia.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pharmacy, clinical pharmacy, pharmacy practice
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Pharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences
Research Field:Clinical pharmacy and pharmacy practice
Objective Division:Manufacturing
Objective Group:Human pharmaceutical products
Objective Field:Human pharmaceutical treatments
UTAS Author:Atey, TM (Mr Tesfay Atey)
ID Code:145977
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2021-08-16
Last Modified:2021-09-28
Downloads:5 View Download Statistics

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