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Policy Implications for Protecting Health from the Hazards of Fire Smoke. A Panel Discussion Report from the Workshop Landscape Fire Smoke: Protecting Health in an Era of Escalating Fire Risk

Citation

Cowie, CT and Wheeler, A and Tripovich, JS and Porta-Cubas, A and Dennekamp, M and Vardoulakis, S and Goldman, M and Sweet, M and Howard, P and Johnston, F, Policy Implications for Protecting Health from the Hazards of Fire Smoke. A Panel Discussion Report from the Workshop Landscape Fire Smoke: Protecting Health in an Era of Escalating Fire Risk, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health pp. 1-16. ISSN 1661-7827 (2021) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]


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Abstract

Globally, and nationally in Australia, bushfires are expected to increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change. To date, protection of human health from fire smoke has largely relied on individual-level actions. Recent bushfires experienced during the Australian summer of 20192020 occurred over a prolonged period and encompassed far larger geographical areas than previously experienced, resulting in extreme levels of smoke for extended periods of time. This particular bushfire season resulted in highly challenging conditions, where many people were unable to protect themselves from smoke exposures. The Centre for Air pollution, energy and health Research (CAR), an Australian research centre, hosted a two-day symposium, Landscape Fire Smoke: Protecting health in an era of escalating fire risk, on 8 and 9 October 2020. One component of the symposium was a dedicated panel discussion where invited experts were asked to examine alternative policy settings for protecting health from fire smoke hazards with specific reference to interventions to minimise exposure, protection of outdoor workers, and current systems for communicating health risk. This paper documents the proceedings of the expert panel and participant discussion held during the workshop.

Item Details

Item Type:Contribution to Refereed Journal
Keywords:bushfire smoke, public health, risk communication
Research Division:Health Sciences
Research Group:Public health
Research Field:Public health not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Health protection and disaster response
UTAS Author:Johnston, F (Professor Fay Johnston)
ID Code:144930
Year Published:2021
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2021-06-21
Last Modified:2021-06-22
Downloads:0

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