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Shifting focus: the impacts of sustainable seafood certification

Citation

van Putten, I and Longo, C and Arton, A and Watson, M and Anderson, CM and Himes-Cornell, A and Obregon, C and Robinson, L and Van Steveninck, T, Shifting focus: the impacts of sustainable seafood certification, PLoS ONE, 15, (5) Article e0233237. ISSN 1932-6203 (2020) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 The Authors. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0233237

Abstract

Alongside government driven management initiatives to achieve sustainable fisheries management, there remains a role for market-based mechanisms to improve fisheries outcomes. Market-based mechanisms are intended to create positive economic incentives that improve the status and management of fisheries. Research to understand consumer demand for certified fish is central but needs to be mirrored by supply side understanding including why fisheries decide to gain or retain certification and the impact of certification on them and other stakeholders involved. We apply semi-structured interviews in seven different Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries that operate in (or from) Western Australia with the aim of better understanding fisheries sector participation in certification schemes (the supply side) and the impacts and unintended benefits and costs of certification. We find that any positive economic impacts of certification were only realised in a limited number of MSC fisheries in Western Australia, which may be explained by the fact that only a small proportion of Western Australian state-managed fisheries are sold with the MSC label and ex-vessel or consumer market price premiums are therefore mostly not obtained. Positive impacts of certification in these Western Australian fisheries are more of a social and institutional nature, for example, greater social acceptability and increased efficiency in the governance process respectively. However, opinion is divided on whether the combined non-monetary and monetary benefits outweigh the costs.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sustainable seafood certification, fisheries, governance
Research Division:Agricultural, Veterinary and Food Sciences
Research Group:Food sciences
Research Field:Food safety, traceability, certification and authenticity
Objective Division:Environmental Management
Objective Group:Marine systems and management
Objective Field:Marine systems and management not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:van Putten, I (Dr Ingrid Van Putten)
ID Code:143774
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:15
Deposited By:Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration
Deposited On:2021-04-01
Last Modified:2021-06-25
Downloads:7 View Download Statistics

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