eCite Digital Repository

Effect of the combined action of lateral load and axial load on the pile instability in liquefiable soils

Citation

Zhang, X and Tang, L and Li, X and Ling, X and Chan, A, Effect of the combined action of lateral load and axial load on the pile instability in liquefiable soils, Engineering Structures, 205 Article 110074. ISSN 0141-0296 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2019.110074

Abstract

Even with modern design guidelines, collapse of pile-supported structures in liquefiable deposits are still observed after strong earthquakes, and buckling instability of piles has been cited as a possible mechanism of failure in liquefiable soils. However, the buckling failure of pile under the combined action of lateral load and axial load has received little attention. This paper presents a shake-table test to study the failure mechanism of an end-bearing pile partly embedded in a saturated sand layer. It is found that pile with a large mass at the top failed in buckling after the soil fully liquefied. In addition, a pseudo-static analysis method is proposed to evaluate the buckling instability of the pile under the combination of lateral and axial load. The buckling load of the pile was found to decrease with the increase in lateral inertial load. It is hence important for the designers to consider the level of lateral loading during buckling analysis of pile in liquefiable ground. Finally, a possible boundary for safe design is proposed to avoid buckling failure of the pile while considering the effect of inertial load.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:liquefaction, pile foundation, buckling instability, critical buckling load, BNWF model
Research Division:Engineering
Research Group:Civil engineering
Research Field:Earthquake engineering
Objective Division:Construction
Objective Group:Construction processes
Objective Field:Civil construction processes
UTAS Author:Chan, A (Professor Andrew Chan)
ID Code:143591
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:11
Deposited By:Engineering
Deposited On:2021-03-25
Last Modified:2021-09-21
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page