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The association between grip strength measured in childhood, young- and mid-adulthood and prediabetes or type 2 diabetes in mid-adulthood

Citation

Fraser, BJ and Blizzard, L and Buscot, M-J and Schmidt, MD and Dwyer, T and Venn, AJ and Magnussen, CG, The association between grip strength measured in childhood, young- and mid-adulthood and prediabetes or type 2 diabetes in mid-adulthood, Sports Medicine, 51, (1) pp. 175-183. ISSN 0112-1642 (2020) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 the authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1007/s40279-020-01328-2

Abstract

Background: Although low child and adult grip strength is associated with adverse cardiometabolic health, how grip strength across the life course associates with type 2 diabetes is unknown. This study identified the relative contribution of grip strength measured at specific life stages (childhood, young adulthood, mid-adulthood) with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes in mid-adulthood.

Methods: Between 1985 and 2019, 263 participants had their grip strength measured using an isometric dynamometer in childhood (9-15 years), young adulthood (28-36 years) and mid-adulthood (38-49 years). In mid-adulthood, a fasting blood sample was collected and tested for glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Participants were categorized as having prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if fasting glucose levels were ≥ 5.6 mmol or if HbA1c levels were ≥ 5.7% (≥ 39 mmol/mol). A Bayesian relevant life course exposure model examined the association between lifelong grip strength and prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.

Results: Grip strength at each time point was equally associated with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes in mid-adulthood (childhood: 37%, young adulthood: 36%, mid-adulthood: 28%). A one standard deviation increase in cumulative grip strength was associated with 34% reduced odds of prediabetes or type 2 diabetes in mid-adulthood (OR 0.66, 95% credible interval 0.40, 0.98).

Conclusions: Greater grip strength across the life course could protect against the development of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aimed at increasing muscular strength in childhood and maintaining behaviours to improve strength into adulthood could improve future cardiometabolic health. The Association Between Grip Strength Measured in Childhood, Young- and Mid-adulthood and Prediabetes or Type 2 Diabetes in Mid-adulthood.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Clinical sciences
Research Field:Sports medicine
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Clinical health not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Fraser, BJ (Dr Brooklyn Fraser)
UTAS Author:Blizzard, L (Professor Leigh Blizzard)
UTAS Author:Buscot, M-J (Dr Marie-Jeanne Buscot)
UTAS Author:Dwyer, T (Professor Terry Dwyer)
UTAS Author:Venn, AJ (Professor Alison Venn)
UTAS Author:Magnussen, CG (Associate Professor Costan Magnussen)
ID Code:140533
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:9
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2020-08-26
Last Modified:2021-05-04
Downloads:6 View Download Statistics

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