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Energy drink intake is associated with insomnia and decreased daytime functioning in young adult females

Citation

Trapp, GS and Hurworth, M and Jacoby, P and Maddison, K and Allen, K and Martin, K and Christian, H and Ambrosini, GL and Oddy, WH and Eastwood, PR, Energy drink intake is associated with insomnia and decreased daytime functioning in young adult females, Public Health Nutrition pp. 1-10. ISSN 1368-9800 (2020) [Refereed Article]


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The Author(s), 2020

DOI: doi:10.1017/S1368980020001652

Abstract

Objective:To investigate the association between energy drink (ED) use and sleep-related disturbances in a population-based sample of young adults from the Raine Study.

Design: Analysis of cross-sectional data obtained from self-administered questionnaires to assess ED use and sleep disturbance (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Symptoms Questionnaire-Insomnia (PSSQ-I)). Regression modelling was used to estimate the effect of ED use on sleep disturbances. All models adjusted for various potential confounders.

Setting: Western Australia.

Participants: Males and females, aged 22 years, from Raine Study Gen2-22 year follow-up.

Results: Of the 1115 participants, 66 % were never/rare users (i.e. once/month to

Conclusions: We found a positive association between ED use and sleep disturbances in young adult females. Given the importance of sleep for overall health, and ever-increasing ED use, intervention strategies are needed to curb ED use in young adults, particularly females. Further research is needed to determine causation and elucidate reasons for gender-specific findings.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:energy drinks, females, insomnia, sleep, The Raine Study, young adults
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and dietetics
Research Field:Nutrigenomics and personalised nutrition
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
UTAS Author:Oddy, WH (Professor Wendy Oddy)
ID Code:140403
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2020-08-13
Last Modified:2021-04-27
Downloads:3 View Download Statistics

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