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Trophic rewilding of native extirpated predators on Bass Strait Islands could benefit woodland birds

Citation

Fielding, MW and Buettel, JC and Brook, BW, Trophic rewilding of native extirpated predators on Bass Strait Islands could benefit woodland birds, Emu pp. 1-3. ISSN 0158-4197 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2020 BirdLife Australia

DOI: doi:10.1080/01584197.2020.1797509

Abstract

Woodland birds are increasingly threatened by the impacts of environmental change. As the global population and economy grow, we continue to modify habitat for human use, reducing available nesting and foraging opportunities for birds. In addition, post-European occupation has led to the introduction of alien species, like cats (Felis catus), and the expansion of generalist species, like corvids, resulting in increased predation and competition for vulnerable bird species. To successfully preserve habitats, manage invasive species and conserve both endangered and common-but-declining bird species we need pre-emptive and innovative management strategies that can be implemented now.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:trophic rewilding, conservation, threatened species, invasive species, wildlife management
Research Division:Environmental Sciences
Research Group:Environmental management
Research Field:Conservation and biodiversity
Objective Division:Environmental Management
Objective Group:Terrestrial systems and management
Objective Field:Terrestrial biodiversity
UTAS Author:Fielding, MW (Mr Matthew Fielding)
UTAS Author:Buettel, JC (Dr Jessie Buettel)
UTAS Author:Brook, BW (Professor Barry Brook)
ID Code:140308
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Plant Science
Deposited On:2020-08-06
Last Modified:2021-01-27
Downloads:0

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