eCite Digital Repository

Western Australia Atropine for the Treatment of Myopia (WA-ATOM) study: Rationale, methodology and participant baseline characteristics

Citation

Lee, SSY and Mackey, DA and Lingham, G and Crewe, JM and Richards, MD and Chen, FK and Charng, J and Ng, F and Flitcroft, I and Loughman, JJ and Azuara-Blanco, A and Logan, NS and Hammond, CJ and Chia, A and Truong, TT and Clark, A, Western Australia Atropine for the Treatment of Myopia (WA-ATOM) study: Rationale, methodology and participant baseline characteristics, Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 48 pp. 569-579. ISSN 1442-6404 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

DOI: doi:10.1111/ceo.13736

Abstract

Importance: Atropine eyedrops are a promising treatment for slowing myopia progression in East Asian children. However, its effects on children in Australia, including those of non-Asian background, have not been well-studied.

Background: The Western Australia Atropine for the Treatment of Myopia (WA-ATOM) study aims to determine the efficacy and long-term effects of low-dose atropine eyedrops in myopia control. This paper describes the study rationale, methodology and participant baseline characteristics.

Design: Single-centre, double-masked, randomized controlled trial.

Participants: Children (6-16 years) with spherical equivalent ≤-1.50 D in each eye, astigmatism ≤1.50 D and myopia progression by ≥0.50 D/year.

Methods: Enrolled children were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive 0.01% atropine or placebo eyedrops. Participants are examined every 6 months during first 3 years of the study (2-year treatment phase followed by a 1-year washout phase), and then at a 5-year follow-up (2 years after the end of the washout phase).

Main outcome measures: Annual progression rate of myopia and axial length, tolerability to eyedrops and incidence and severity of unwanted effects.

Results: Out of 311 children who were referred, 242 were suitable for study participation, and 153 were subsequently enrolled. The baseline characteristics of enrolled participants are presented.

Conclusions and relevance: Outcomes of the WA-ATOM study will inform on the efficacy, tolerability, safety and long-term effects of low-dose atropine eyedrops in myopia control in Australian children. The impact of ocular sun exposure, iris colour and parental myopia on the efficacy of low-dose atropine will also be assessed.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:atropine eyedrop, myopia, myopia control, myopia treatment
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Ophthalmology and optometry
Research Field:Ophthalmology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Clinical health not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Mackey, DA (Professor David Mackey)
ID Code:140002
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:4
Deposited By:Medicine
Deposited On:2020-07-22
Last Modified:2021-04-14
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page