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Comparison of radiographic and MRI osteoarthritis definitions and their combination for prediction of tibial cartilage loss, knee symptoms and total knee replacement: a longitudinal study

Citation

Cai, G and Cicuttini, F and Aitken, D and Laslett, LL and Zhu, Z and Winzenberg, T and Jones, G, Comparison of radiographic and MRI osteoarthritis definitions and their combination for prediction of tibial cartilage loss, knee symptoms and total knee replacement: a longitudinal study, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage pp. 1-9. ISSN 1063-4584 (2020) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.1016/j.joca.2020.04.017

Abstract

Objective: To describe the value of radiographic- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (ROA and MRI-OA, respectively) and in combination for predicting tibial cartilage loss, knee pain and disability and total knee replacement (TKR) in a population-based cohort.

Design: A radiograph and 1.5T MRI of the right knee was performed. ROA and MRI-OA at baseline were defined according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International atlas and a published Delphi exercise, respectively. Tibial cartilage volume was measured over 2.6 and 10.7 years. Knee pain and disability were assessed at baseline, 2.6, 5.1 and 10.7 years. Right-sided TKRs were assessed over 13.5 years.

Results: Of 574 participants (mean 62 years, 49% female), 8% had ROA alone, 15% had MRI-OA alone, 13% had both ROA and MRI-OA. Having ROA (vs. no ROA) and MRI-OA (vs. no MRI-OA) predicted greater tibial cartilage loss over 2.6 years (-75.9 and -86.4 mm3/year) and higher risk of TKR over 13.5 years (Risk Ratio [RR]: 15.0 and 10.9). Only MRI-OA predicted tibial cartilage loss over 10.7 years (-7.1 mm3/year) and only ROA predicted onset and progression of knee symptoms (RR: 1.32-1.88). In participants with both MRI-OA and ROA, tibial cartilage loss was the greatest (over 2.6 years: -116.1 mm3/year; over 10.7 years: -11.2 mm3/year), and the onset and progression of knee symptoms (RR: 1.75-2.89) and risk of TKR (RR: 50.9) were the highest.

Conclusions: The Delphi definition of MRI-OA is not superior to ROA for predicting structural or symptomatic OA progression but, combining MRI-OA and ROA has much stronger predictive validity.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:cartilage volume, knee osteoarthritis, MRI, pain, radiograph, total knee replacement
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Rheumatology and Arthritis
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
UTAS Author:Cai, G (Mr Guoqi Cai)
UTAS Author:Aitken, D (Associate Professor Dawn Aitken)
UTAS Author:Laslett, LL (Dr Laura Laslett)
UTAS Author:Winzenberg, T (Professor Tania Winzenberg)
UTAS Author:Jones, G (Professor Graeme Jones)
ID Code:139724
Year Published:2020
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2020-06-30
Last Modified:2020-06-30
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