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Early exposure to infections doesn't protect against allergies, but getting into nature might

Citation

Flies, E and Weinstein, P, Early exposure to infections doesn't protect against allergies, but getting into nature might, The Conversation, The Conversation Media Group Ltd, Australia, 7 February 2020 (2020) [Newspaper Article]


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Abstract

Over the past few decades, allergies and asthma have become common childhood diseases, especially in developed countries. Almost 20% of Australians experience some kind of allergy, whether itís to food, pollen, dust, housemites, mould or animals.

When people suffer from food allergies, hay fever or asthma, their immune system incorrectly believes the trigger substances are harmful and mounts a defence.

The response can range from mild symptoms, such as sneezing and a blocked nose (in the case of hay fever), to anaphylaxis (from severe food allergies or bee stings) and asthma attacks.

Item Details

Item Type:Newspaper Article
Keywords:health, biodiversity, microbiome, nature, urban
Research Division:Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
Research Group:Human resources and industrial relations
Research Field:Occupational and workplace health and safety
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Public health (excl. specific population health) not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Flies, E (Dr Emily Flies)
ID Code:139574
Year Published:2020
Deposited By:Plant Science
Deposited On:2020-06-22
Last Modified:2021-06-03
Downloads:0

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