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Understanding the Western Port Environment: A summary of current knowledge and priorities for future research

Citation

Boon, P and Dann, P and Dittmann, S and Jenkins, G and Lee, R and Quinn, G and Ross, J and Walker, D and Wilson, R, Understanding the Western Port Environment: A summary of current knowledge and priorities for future research pp. 228. (2011) [Other Review]


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Abstract

Western Port is a unique feature on the Victorian coast, a large, semi-enclosed embayment on an exposed coastline, formed by complex geological processes. Superficially similar to Port Phillip Bay, it is more complex than its western neighbor, with a greater tidal range, extensive intertidal mudflats, and two large islands (Phillip Island and French Island). The tidal flats are cut by deep channels, with several catchments draining (some artificially connected) into the northeastern and eastern parts of the bay. All of this makes for complex oceanographic circulation. Much of its coastline is fringed by mangroves and saltmarshes, and there are extensive seagrass meadows on mudflats and below the low tide level.

Item Details

Item Type:Other Review
Keywords:western port, ecosystem, review, environment
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Marine and estuarine ecology (incl. marine ichthyology)
Objective Division:Environmental Management
Objective Group:Terrestrial systems and management
Objective Field:Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems
UTAS Author:Ross, J (Associate Professor Jeff Ross)
ID Code:138611
Year Published:2011
Deposited By:Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration
Deposited On:2020-04-17
Last Modified:2020-04-20
Downloads:1 View Download Statistics

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