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The impact of self-reported sleep quantity on perceived decision-making in sports officials during a competitive season

Citation

Vincent, GE and Onay, Z and Scanlan, AT and Elsworthy, N and Pitchford, NW and Lastella, M, The impact of self-reported sleep quantity on perceived decision-making in sports officials during a competitive season, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 92, (1) pp. 156-169. ISSN 0270-1367 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 SHAPE America

DOI: doi:10.1080/02701367.2020.1722309

Abstract

Objectives: While sleep research in athletes is extensive, no research has investigated sleep in sports officials during a competitive season. This study explored the (a) self-reported quantity and quality of sleep obtained by sports officials according to the time of competition (day or evening) and (b) impact of reduced sleep on perceived decision-making ability.

Design: Sports officials (n = 371) from various sporting codes completed an online questionnaire that evaluated self-reported sleep quantity and quality on habitual nights, before competition, and after competition, as well as perceived decision-making constructs.

Results: With sleep restriction defined as less than 7 h of sleep, mixed-effects logistic regression revealed that the estimated probability of reporting reduced sleep quantity increased (p< .05) on habitual nights (0.58), before competition (0.48), and after competition (0.56). The estimated probability of reporting poor sleep quality was 0.01-0.04 across all nights. When considering time of competition (day or evening), reduced sleep quantity was experienced after evening competition (odds ratio [OR] = 3.33, p < .05), while poorer sleep quality (p< .05) was experienced following day (OR = 2.1) and evening (OR = 12.46) competition compared to habitual nights. Furthermore, the impact of reduced sleep on perceived decision-making constructs was negative, with the estimated probability of reporting impaired perceived decision-making between 0.13 and 0.21.

Conclusion: Overall, sports officials are vulnerable to reduced quantity and quality of sleep before and after competition, with impaired perceived decision-making ability following nights of less than average sleep.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sleep, officials, decision-making, health
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Clinical sciences
Research Field:Sports medicine
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health)
Objective Field:Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Pitchford, NW (Dr Nathan Pitchford)
ID Code:138283
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2020-03-31
Last Modified:2021-09-16
Downloads:0

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