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Characterization of the CO2 system in a Coral Reef, a seagrass meadow, and a mangrove forest in the central Red Sea

Citation

Saderne, V and Baldry, K and Anton, A and Agusti, S and Duarte, CM, Characterization of the CO2 system in a Coral Reef, a seagrass meadow, and a mangrove forest in the central Red Sea, JGR Oceans, 124, (11) pp. 7513-7528. ISSN 2169-9275 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2019 American Geophysical Union

DOI: doi:10.1029/2019JC015266

Abstract

The Red Sea is characterized by its high seawater temperature and salinity, and the resilience of its coastal ecosystems to global warming is of growing interest. This high salinity and temperature might also render the Red Sea a favorable ecosystem for calcification and therefore resistant to ocean acidification. However, there is a lack of survey data on the CO2 system of Red Sea coastal ecosystems. A 1‐year survey of the CO2 system was performed in a seagrass lagoon, a mangrove forest, and a coral reef in the central Red Sea, including fortnight seawater sampling and high‐frequency pHT monitoring. In the coral reef, the CO2 system mean and variability over the measurement period are within the range of other world's reefs with pHT, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), pCO2, and Ωarag of 8.0160.077, 206158 μmol/kg, 241534 μmol/kg, 46139 μatm, and 3.90.4, respectively. Here, comparisons with an offshore site highlight dominance of calcification and photosynthesis in summer‐autumn, and dissolution and heterotrophy in winter‐spring. In the seagrass meadow, the pHT, DIC, TA, pCO2, and Ωarag were 8.000.09, 198668 μmol/kg, 235249 μmol/kg, 41166 μatm, and 4.00.3, respectively. The seagrass meadow TA and DIC were consistently lower than offshore water. The mangrove forest showed the highest amplitudes of variation, with pHT, DIC, TA, pCO2, and Ωarag, were 7.950.26, 2069132 μmol/kg, 243891 μmol/kg, 493178 μatm, and 4.10.6, respectively. We highlight the need for more research on sources and sinks of DIC and TA in coastal ecosystems.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:carbon chemistry, seagrass, mangrove, coral reef, Red Sea, pH, variability
Research Division:Earth Sciences
Research Group:Oceanography
Research Field:Chemical oceanography
Objective Division:Environmental Management
Objective Group:Marine systems and management
Objective Field:Measurement and assessment of marine water quality and condition
UTAS Author:Baldry, K (Miss Kimberlee Baldry)
ID Code:137768
Year Published:2019
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Directorate
Deposited On:2020-03-03
Last Modified:2020-06-12
Downloads:3 View Download Statistics

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