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Modelling the effects of beverage substitution during adolescence on later obesity outcomes in early adulthood: results from the Raine study

Citation

Zheng, M and Rangan, A and Huang, R-C and Beilin, LJ and Mori, TA and Oddy, WH and Ambrosini, GL, Modelling the effects of beverage substitution during adolescence on later obesity outcomes in early adulthood: results from the Raine study, Nutrients, 11, (12) Article 2928. ISSN 2072-6643 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2019 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3390/nu11122928

Abstract

High sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption has been linked with obesity. The present study examined the associations between adolescent SSB intake and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and overweight status in early adulthood, and modelled the association of alternative beverage substitution with BMI and WC. Data of offspring from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study at ages 14 and 22 years were used (n = 667). SSB intake at 14 years (100 g/day) was associated with higher BMI (β = 0.19 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.04, 0.33), WC (β = 0.41cm, 95% CI 0.04, 0.78), and being overweight at 22 years (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02, 1.18). Every 100g modelled substitution of SSB with milk at age 14 years was associated with lower BMI (-0.19 kg/m2) and WC (-0.52 cm) at age 22 years. Replacement of SSB with diet drink was associated with higher BMI and WC. No association was found for substitutions of SSB with water, tea/coffee, or 100% fruit juice with BMI or WC. SSB intake during adolescence was associated with higher BMI, WC, and being overweight in early adulthood. Milk as an alternative to SSB was associated with less adiposity. Caution is necessary in recommending diet drinks as a SSB alternative.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sugar-sweetened beverages, obesity, waist circumference, substitution modelling
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and dietetics
Research Field:Public health nutrition
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
UTAS Author:Oddy, WH (Professor Wendy Oddy)
ID Code:137273
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2020-02-06
Last Modified:2020-03-30
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