eCite Digital Repository

The Interfaces Between Science, Medicine, Law and Law Enforcement

Citation

Kelty, S and Julian, R, The Interfaces Between Science, Medicine, Law and Law Enforcement, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (2012) [Contract Report]


Preview
PDF
Not available
580Kb
  

Abstract

Forensic science is increasingly relied on in police investigations and in criminal trials to exonerate the innocent and assist in establishing links to crime. With this increased reliance on forensic science the potential for unjust outcomes increases, especially in serious matters (homicide/sexual assault). The reasons for this are twofold: first, the more serious the matter, the more likely that evidence mishandling can lead to wrongful imprisonment; second, the more likely the personnel involved in serious cases will be multi-disciplinary (police, medicine, law, forensic science) and multi-organisational (Health, Justice, Police, private legal/medical). The importance of identifying effective multi-organisational interactions was highlighted in a judicial report into the wrongful imprisonment of an Australian male for a sexual assault he did not commit. The report noted one factor that led to the unjust outcome was the limited communication and interactions between law enforcement, medical, forensic science and legal practitioners throughout the entirety of the case.

Item Details

Item Type:Contract Report
Keywords:forensic science, sexual assault, homicide, criminal justice
Research Division:Studies in Human Society
Research Group:Criminology
Research Field:Criminology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Law, Politics and Community Services
Objective Group:Justice and the Law
Objective Field:Criminal Justice
UTAS Author:Kelty, S (Dr Sally Kelty)
UTAS Author:Julian, R (Professor Roberta Julian)
ID Code:137071
Year Published:2012
Deposited By:Office of the School of Social Sciences
Deposited On:2020-01-30
Last Modified:2020-01-30
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page