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Mothers' views of health problems in the 12 months after childbirth: a concept mapping study

Citation

Rouhi, M and Stirling, CM and Crisp, EP, Mothers' views of health problems in the 12 months after childbirth: a concept mapping study, Journal of Advanced Nursing pp. 1-13. ISSN 0309-2402 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

DOI: doi:10.1111/jan.14187

Abstract

Aims: To identify the health problems that women feel require help and subsequent help-seeking behaviour during the 12 months period after childbirth.

Background: Many women experience physical and mental health problems after childbirth, but there is a gap in understanding how they perceive their health after childbirth. Studies suggested they are inhibited in expressing their needs and so seek informal rather than professional help for their health problems.

Design: A mixed method concept mapping study.

Method: Two groups of Australian women were recruited by an online platform and purposive sampling (N = 81) in 2017-2018, based on an established concept mapping methodology. A first group created 83 brainstorm statements about post-childbirth health problems and help-seeking and a second group sorted and rated the statements based on their perception of the prevalence of the issues and the help-seeking advice they would offer to others. Bradshaw`s Taxonomy of Needs was used to theoretically underpins the explanation of the results of women's felt need after childbirth.

Results: Multidimensional scaling resulted in six clusters of issues which were categorized into three domains: 'health issues and care', 'support' and 'fitness'. Despite being directly asked, about two-thirds of the women did not report experiencing any health problems.

Conclusion: Our findings showed women had a broader perception of healthcare needs which included support and fitness. There is a potential gap in services for women who do not have good social support.

Impact: Family and friends were a key source of help-seeking. Post-childbirth routine care was focused on infant care and limited to the first 6 weeks after childbirth. The content of current post-childbirth care must be reviewed.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Bradshaw taxonomy, concept mapping, felt need, help‐seeking behaviour, morbidities, nursing, social need, support
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Nursing
Research Field:Midwifery
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Health and Support Services
Objective Field:Nursing
UTAS Author:Rouhi, M (Mrs Maryam Rouhi)
UTAS Author:Stirling, CM (Associate Professor Christine Stirling)
UTAS Author:Crisp, EP (Dr Elaine Crisp)
ID Code:135835
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Nursing
Deposited On:2019-11-15
Last Modified:2019-12-13
Downloads:0

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