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Piloting a clinical laboratory method to evaluate the influence of potential modified risk tobacco products on smokers' quit-related motivation, choice, and behavior

Citation

Ozga-Hess, JE and Felicione, NJ and Ferguson, SG and Dino, G and Elswick, D and Whitworth, C and Turiano, N and Blank, MD, Piloting a clinical laboratory method to evaluate the influence of potential modified risk tobacco products on smokers' quit-related motivation, choice, and behavior, Addictive Behaviors, 99 pp. 1-9. ISSN 0306-4603 (2019) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2019 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106105

Abstract

Research methods are needed that can predict whether the availability of potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) may influence smokers' quit-related motivation, choice, and behavior. This pilot study assessed the primary outcomes of feasibility and adherence to address this need using an electronic cigarette (ECIG) as a model MRTP. Cigarette smokers were randomly assigned to use only their own brand of cigarettes (OB-only) or a second-generation ECIG (18 ng/ml nicotine) plus their OB cigarettes (ECIG+OB) ad libitum for four weeks. Participants logged products using a mobile device, collected used cigarette filters, and provided saliva samples every day for analysis of cotinine. They returned to the lab once per week to provide a breath sample and accept or decline a choice to quit all tobacco products (i.e., cigarettes and/or ECIGs). They also returned for a onemonth follow-up visit. Of those participants randomized (n = 60), 56.7% completed the 4-week intervention and 40.0% completed the follow-up visit. The primary reason for withdrawal was poor adherence with mobile device use. Comparable numbers of participants in each group chose to make a quit attempt, although more OB-only participants chose to quit during the first two weeks and more ECIG+OB participants during the last two weeks. With protocol modifications to reduce participation burden, the current method might ultimately be used by regulators to predict how smokers' quit-related motivation, choice, and behavior are influenced by current and future MRTPs.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:smoking cessation, e-cigs, electronic cigarettes
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Behaviour and Health
UTAS Author:Ferguson, SG (Associate Professor Stuart Ferguson)
ID Code:134998
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Medicine
Deposited On:2019-09-19
Last Modified:2019-11-13
Downloads:0

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