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The effect of organizational and individual factors on health and safety practices: results from a cross-sectional study among manufacturing industrial workers

Citation

Tafere, GA and Kebede, G and Wami, SD, The effect of organizational and individual factors on health and safety practices: results from a cross-sectional study among manufacturing industrial workers, Journal of Public Health pp. 1-7. ISSN 1741-3842 (2019) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10389...

DOI: doi:10.1007/s10389-019-01050-y

Abstract

Background: Manufacturing industries are one of the leading industries, where a large work force is employed and most accidents occurred. Unsafe safety practices are the primary cause for most workplace injuries and illnesses. However, in Ethiopia there is inadequate, limited, and narrow research attention with regard to the health and safety practices among manufacturing industrial workers. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effect of organizational and individual factors on health and safety practices.

Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April 2017. A stratified sampling technique was used to select 403 study participants from within the manufacturing industries. In addition to a structured questionnaire, an observational checklist was used to assess the working conditions. Bivariate and multivariable binary logistic regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 20. Significance level was obtained at 95% CI and p value ≤ 0.05. Odds ratio was used to determine the strength of association.

Result: The overall percentage of good health and safety practices among workers in manufacturing industries was 57.5% (95% CI: 52.4, 62). Work experience > 5 years (AOR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.44, 5.29) and a level of education of diploma and above (AOR = 6.49, 95% CI: 1.31, 31.86) were important predictors of good health and safety practices. Moreover, working hours ≤ 48 h per week (AOR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.78), safety training (AOR = 3.95, 95% CI: 2.20, 7.12), and management support (AOR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.15) were significantly associated organizational factors for good health and safety practices.

Conclusion: This study highlights the need for ongoing health and safety training, management commitment to health and safety of employees, and provision of appropriate personal protective equipment to enhance health and safety practices of workers.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:health and safety, safety practice, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health)
Objective Field:Occupational Health
UTAS Author:Kebede, G (Mr Getahun Beyera)
ID Code:134342
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Office of the School of Health Sciences
Deposited On:2019-08-07
Last Modified:2019-09-18
Downloads:0

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