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Impacts of the changing ocean-sea ice system on the key forage fish arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and subsistence fisheries in the Western Canadian arctic-evaluating linked climate, ecosystem and economic (CEE) models

Citation

Steiner, NS and Cheung, WWL and Cisneros-Montemayor, AM and Drost, H and Hayashida, H and Hoover, C and Lam, J and Sou, T and Sumaila, UR and Suprenand, P and Tai, TC and VanderZwaag, DL, Impacts of the changing ocean-sea ice system on the key forage fish arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and subsistence fisheries in the Western Canadian arctic-evaluating linked climate, ecosystem and economic (CEE) models, Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, (APRIL) Article 179. ISSN 2296-7745 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2019 Steiner, Cheung, Cisneros-Montemayor, Drost, Hayashida, Hoover, Lam, Sou, Sumaila, Suprenand, Tai and VanderZwaag. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3389/fmars.2019.00179

Abstract

This study synthesizes results from observations, laboratory experiments and models to showcase how the integration of scientific methods and indigenous knowledge can improve our understanding of (a) past and projected changes in environmental conditions and marine species; (b) their effects on social and ecological systems in the respective communities; and (c) support management and planning tools for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The study links climate-ecosystem-economic (CEE) models and discusses uncertainties within those tools. The example focuses on the key forage species in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (Western Canadian Arctic), i.e., Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida). Arctic cod can be trophically linked to sea-ice algae and pelagic primary producers and are key vectors for energy transfers from plankton to higher trophic levels (e.g., ringed seals, beluga), which are harvested by Inuit peoples. Fundamental changes in ice and ocean conditions in the region affect the marine ecosystem and fish habitat. Model simulations suggest increasing trends in oceanic phytoplankton and sea-ice algae with high interannual variability. The latter might be linked to interannual variations in Arctic cod abundance and mask trends in observations. CEE simulations incorporating physiological temperature limits data for the distribution of Arctic cod, result in an estimated 17% decrease in Arctic cod populations by the end of the century (high emission scenario), but suggest increases in abundance for other Arctic and sub-Arctic species. The Arctic cod decrease is largely caused by increased temperatures and constraints in northward migration, and could directly impact key subsistence species. Responses to acidification are still highly uncertain, but sensitivity simulations suggests an additional 1% decrease in Arctic cod populations due to pH impacts on growth and survival. Uncertainties remain with respect to detailed future changes, but general results are likely correct and in line with results from other approaches. To reduce uncertainties, higher resolution models with improved parameterizations and better understanding of the species' physiological limits are required. Arctic communities should be directly involved, receive tools and training to conduct local, unified research and food chain monitoring while decisions regarding commercial fisheries will need to be precautionary and adaptive in light of the existing uncertainties.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sea ice, cod, CEE models, fisheries
Research Division:Environmental Sciences
Research Group:Ecological Applications
Research Field:Ecological Impacts of Climate Change
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Climate and Climate Change
Objective Field:Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments (excl. Social Impacts)
UTAS Author:Hayashida, H (Mr Hakase Hayashida)
ID Code:133821
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Fisheries and Aquaculture
Deposited On:2019-07-11
Last Modified:2019-09-25
Downloads:2 View Download Statistics

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