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DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: some ways forward in overcoming issues and concerns in the gaming studies field

Citation

Kuss, DJ and Griffiths, MD and Pontes, HM, DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: some ways forward in overcoming issues and concerns in the gaming studies field, Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 6, (2) pp. 133-141. ISSN 2062-5871 (2017) [Review Several Works]


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DOI: doi:10.1556/2006.6.2017.032

Abstract

Background and aims: The current DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013) has led to a number of issues and concerns that we highlighted in our recent paper (Kuss, Griffiths, & Pontes, 2017). Experts in the field responded to our evaluation of these issues resulting in six commentaries. Methods: In this paper, we offer responses to the six commentaries to move the scientific field forward. All of the responses to our original paper highlighted many conceptual, theoretical, and/or methodological problems with the proposed IGD diagnosis as outlined in the DSM-5. We outline some ways forward in overcoming issues and concerns in the gaming studies field. Results: We argue that rather than stigmatizing gaming per se, the role of scientists and practitioners is to establish a clear-cut distinction between someone who may use games excessively but non-problematically and someone who is experiencing significant impairment in their daily lives as a consequence of their excessive gaming. This responsibility needs to be shared by popular media who are often quick to build a moral panic around gaming behaviors, often based on cherry-picking specific case studies and pieces of research which support their headlines. Conclusion: Researchers, practitioners, gaming developers, and the media need to work together and collaboratively to build a realistic and comprehensive understanding of gaming as a normal, enjoyable, and often beneficial sociocultural practice, which for a small minority of excessive users may be associated with the experience of addiction-related symptoms that may require professional support.

Item Details

Item Type:Review Several Works
Keywords:Internet Gaming Disorder, gaming addiction, diagnosis, DSM
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Mental Health
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Mental Health
UTAS Author:Pontes, HM (Dr Halley Pontes)
ID Code:132469
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:20
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2019-05-08
Last Modified:2019-06-03
Downloads:0

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