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Higher non-processed red meat consumption is associated with a reduced risk of central nervous system demyelination

Citation

Black, LJ and Bowe, GS and Pereira, G and Lucas, RM and Dear, K and van der Mei, I and Sherriff, JL, and the Ausimmune Investigator Group, Higher non-processed red meat consumption is associated with a reduced risk of central nervous system demyelination, Frontiers in Neurology, 10 Article 125. ISSN 1664-2295 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2019 Black, Bowe, Pereira, Lucas, Dear, van der Mei, Sherriff and the Ausimmune Investigator Group. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

DOI: doi:10.3389/fneur.2019.00125

Abstract

The evidence associating red meat consumption and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. We tested associations between red meat consumption and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD), often presaging a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. We used food frequency questionnaire data from the 2003-2006 Ausimmune Study, an incident, matched, case-control study examining environmental risk factors for FCD. We calculated non-processed and processed red meat density (g/1,000 kcal/day). Conditional logistic regression models (with participants matched on age, sex, and study region) were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) and p-values for associations between non-processed (n = 689, 250 cases, 439 controls) and processed (n = 683, 248 cases, 435 controls) red meat density and risk of FCD. Models were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. A one standard deviation increase in non-processed red meat density (22 g/1,000 kcal/day) was associated with a 19% reduced risk of FCD (AOR = 0.81; 95%CI 0.68, 0.97; p = 0.02). When stratified by sex, higher non-processed red meat density (per 22 g/1,000 kcal/day) was associated with a 26% reduced risk of FCD in females (n = 519; AOR = 0.74; 95%CI 0.60, 0.92; p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant association between non-processed red meat density and risk of FCD in males (n = 170). We found no statistically significant association between processed red meat density and risk of FCD. Further investigation is warranted to understand the important components of a diet that includes non-processed red meat for lower FCD risk.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:red meat, processed meat, Ausimmune Study, multiple sclerosis, diet
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Central Nervous System
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
UTAS Author:van der Mei, I (Associate Professor Ingrid van der Mei)
ID Code:131609
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2019-03-27
Last Modified:2019-04-03
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